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Can someone please explain to me why the output from the following code is saying that arrays are not equal?

int main()
{

    int iar1[] = {1,2,3,4,5};
    int iar2[] = {1,2,3,4,5};

    if (iar1 == iar2)
        cout << "Arrays are equal.";
    else
        cout << "Arrays are not equal.";

    return 0;   
}
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17  
Use std::array or std::vector. C arrays have no single advantage and they only bring pain and sorrow. No excuses. –  daknøk Oct 12 '12 at 20:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 26 down vote accepted
if (iar1 == iar2)

Here iar1 and iar2 are decaying to pointers to the first elements of the respective arrays. Since they are two distinct arrays, the pointer values are, of course, different and your comparison tests not equal.

To do an element-wise comparison, you must either write a loop; or use std::array instead

std::array<int, 5> iar1 {1,2,3,4,5};
std::array<int, 5> iar2 {1,2,3,4,5};

if( iar1 == iar2 ) {
  // arrays contents are the same

} else {
  // not the same

}
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+1 for the only answer with the word "decay" (or anything else explicitly saying so). –  chris Oct 12 '12 at 20:19
1  
"... you must either write a loop...." Better would be to use std::equal. Not to detract from your point that using raw arrays is the main problem. –  Ben Oct 19 '12 at 17:40

You're not comparing the contents of the arrays, you're comparing the addresses of the arrays. Since they're two separate arrays, they have different addresses.

Avoid this problem by using higher-level containers, such as std::vector, std::deque, or std::array.

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1  
It's important to note that these containers have implemented their own == operator that performs this check. –  tadman Oct 12 '12 at 20:23

Since nobody mentioned it yet, you can compare arrays with the std::equal algorithm:

int iar1[] = {1,2,3,4,5};
int iar2[] = {1,2,3,4,5};

if (std::equal(std::begin(iar1), std::end(iar1), std::begin(iar2)))
    cout << "Arrays are equal.";
else
    cout << "Arrays are not equal.";

You need to include <algorithm> and <iterator>. If you don't use C++11 yet, you can write:

if (std::equal(iar1, iar1 + sizeof iar1 / sizeof *iar1, iar2))
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Array is not a primitive type, and the arrays belong to different addresses in the C++ memory.

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You are comparing the addresses instead of the values.

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Right. In most, if not all implementations of C, the array identifier can be implicitly casted to a pointer to the first element (i.e. the first element's address). What you're doing here is comparing those addresses, which is obviously wrong.

Instead, you need to iterate over both arrays, checking each element against each other. If you get to the end of both without a failure, they're equal.

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1  
In none is the array identifier actually the address of the first element. The array identifier is actually the array. In int arr[6], arr refers to a value of type int[6]. That value is implicitly convertible to int*, with the value &arr[0] (often called decaying). But an array is not "actually" a pointer. –  GManNickG Oct 12 '12 at 20:25
    
I typed that completely wrong. Editing it now. Thanks. –  slugonamission Oct 12 '12 at 20:27

When we use an array, we are really using a pointer to the first element in the array. Hence, this condition if( iar1 == iar2 ) actually compares two addresses. Those pointers do not address the same object.

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