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I have a 1000x1 vector (1000 rows and 1 column). I want to get elements in pairs (row 1 and row 2, row 3 and row 4, row 5 and row 6, etc.)

Here's what I have so far

for (j in 1: ncol(total_loci)){
    for (i in 1: sample_size){
    # a pair
    genotype[i]<- paste(total_loci[i, j], total_loci[i+1,j], sep="")
    }
}

Genotype should thus be a 500x1 vector (500 rows and 1 column) containing the genotype. Assume that my for-loops are correct. I think my I needs to skip every other index -- so my i should start at 1 then 3, 5, 7, 9, etc. The variable total_loci is of class data frame.

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Generate groupings using rep(seq()), reshape wide and mapply? –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 12 '12 at 20:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't loop, use seq instead:

# sample data
x <- replicate(5, sample(LETTERS, 1000, replace=TRUE), simplify=FALSE)
x <- as.data.frame(x, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
names(x) <- paste("V",1:NCOL(x), sep="")

# function
f <- function(x) {
  s <- seq(2, length(x), 2)
  paste(x[s-1], x[s], sep="")
}

# run algorithm for each column
y <- as.data.frame(lapply(x, f), stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
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can you tell me what the analogous case be? i.e how it apply these changes to my script? –  user1313954 Oct 12 '12 at 20:19
    
I used the double for-loop because I have a larger matrix -- I think 1000 x n (1000 rows by n columns). I want to loop through every row one column at a time. I should use seq instead? –  user1313954 Oct 12 '12 at 20:24
    
yeah I fixed it. thank you. –  user1313954 Oct 12 '12 at 20:42
    
@user1313954: did you try my code? My sample data has 1000 rows and 5 columns and my code creates a result with 500 rows and 5 columns. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 12 '12 at 20:42
    
now I'm trying to get the right elements in the array. –  user1313954 Oct 12 '12 at 20:43

Here is a general approach for processing an array in consecutive chunks of n elements. You can set n = 2 to process it by pairs.

First, here is a function that splits a vector n-by-n, returning a list of n elements:

n.ny.n <- function(x, n) split(x, 1+(seq_along(x)-1) %% n)

n.by.n(x = 1:24, n = 2)
# $`1`
#  [1]  1  3  5  7  9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23
# 
# $`2`
#  [1]  2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24

Then you can run any function on the slices using mapply, and via do.call:

do.call(mapply, c(FUN = paste, n.by.n(x = 1:24, n = 2), sep = "_"))
#  [1] "1_2"   "3_4"   "5_6"   "7_8"   "9_10"  "11_12" "13_14" "15_16"
#  [9] "17_18" "19_20" "21_22" "23_24"

do.call(mapply, c(FUN = paste, n.by.n(x = 1:24, n = 6), sep = "_"))
# [1] "1_2_3_4_5_6"       "7_8_9_10_11_12"    "13_14_15_16_17_18"
# [4] "19_20_21_22_23_24"
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Here is a way to do it without any apply family calls or loops:

# Generate some sample data.
total_loci<-data.frame(genotype=sample(LETTERS,500,replace=TRUE))
# Paste
paste0(total_loci[c(TRUE,TRUE,FALSE,FALSE),],
       total_loci[c(FALSE,FALSE,TRUE,TRUE),])
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