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I am working on an Mac OS X application, and I would like to know a few things:

What are log files that will be updated when an application is run? and their paths? Would it be possible to turn off logging (programmatically)? If so, would it be possible to do that for a particular application? I want my app to run covertly. so, any other ideas?

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#define NSLog(...) do { } while(0) –  user529758 Oct 12 '12 at 20:19

1 Answer 1

There isn't any standard "Here's every application that was ever launched" log on the system, nor do applications automatically log anything in particular upon launch. For GUI apps, the "Recent Applications" preference will be updated. But any number of things could be updated in response to something your application does, and there's not any finite list of these things or where they might be located (e.g. I could write a custom script that watches for program launches and writes the name of the program and the file handles it holds to ~/Documents/InnocuousFile.tbz).

Basically, as long as you don't log anything yourself, you're doing about as much as you reasonably can do on this front. But this doesn't really make your app covert in any meaningful way, as there are many ways to notice a program's presence other than logs, and I wouldn't even think logs are a big one.

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