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I would like to split a string only where there are at least two or more whitespaces.

For example

str = '10DEUTSCH        GGS Neue Heide 25-27     Wahn-Heide   -1      -1'
print str.split()

Results:

['10DEUTSCH', 'GGS', 'Neue', 'Heide', '25-27', 'Wahn-Heide', '-1', '-1']

and i would like it to see like this:

['10DEUTSCH', 'GGS Neue Heide 25-27', 'Wahn-Heide', '-1', '-1']
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3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted
In [4]: import re    
In [5]: text = '10DEUTSCH        GGS Neue Heide 25-27     Wahn-Heide   -1      -1'
In [7]: re.split(r'\s{2,}', text)
Out[7]: ['10DEUTSCH', 'GGS Neue Heide 25-27', 'Wahn-Heide', '-1', '-1']
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@TimPietzcker: Thanks! –  unutbu Oct 12 '12 at 20:31
    
No need to use regex just do str.split(' '). Also mind you using str as variable name is a bad thing because of the built-in str type. –  Wessie Oct 12 '12 at 20:32
1  
@Wessie: text.split(' ') will produce lots of empty strings because the number of spaces is often greater than 2. –  unutbu Oct 12 '12 at 20:34
    
str.split(' ') results in ['10DEUTSCH', '', '', '', 'GGS Neue Heide 25-27', '', ' Wahn-Heide', ' -1', '', '', '-1']. Regex is a good way to split on "2 or more whitespaces". –  dokkaebi Oct 12 '12 at 20:34
In [30]: strs='10DEUTSCH        GGS Neue Heide 25-27     Wahn-Heide   -1      -1'

In [38]: filter(None,strs.split("  "))

Out[38]: ['10DEUTSCH', 'GGS Neue Heide 25-27', ' Wahn-Heide', ' -1', '-1']

In [32]: map(str.strip,filter(None,strs.split("  ")))

Out[32]: ['10DEUTSCH', 'GGS Neue Heide 25-27', 'Wahn-Heide', '-1', '-1']
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You can use filter(None, ...) or filter(bool, ...) rather than the lambda. –  DSM Oct 12 '12 at 20:36
    
@DSM nice suggestion. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 12 '12 at 20:42

As has been pointed out, str is not a good name for your string, so using words instead:

output = [s.strip() for s in words.split('  ') if s]

The .split(' ') -- with two spaces -- will give you a list that includes empty strings, and items with trailing/leading whitespace. The list comprehension iterates through that list, keeps any non-blank items (if s), and .strip() takes care of any leading/trailing whitespace.

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1  
I think you'd also need to throw a .strip() in there to prevent " -1" (see @Ashwini's solution) –  DSM Oct 12 '12 at 20:44
    
Ah, good point! –  toxotes Oct 12 '12 at 20:52

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