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Given an absolute file system path, how would I detect whether it's on an NTFS partition or not? I would prefer a helping hand in C#, but Win32/C would do. The system which the software will run on, is Windows Vista or later.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use FSCTL_FILESYSTEM_GET_STATISTICS to determine the file system type.

Here's some sample code. I've checked that this handles mount points properly, i.e., it detects the type of the target volume, not the source volume. You don't need to specify the mount point itself (although you can) but the file or directory you specify must exist.

#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0502

#include <windows.h>

#include <stdio.h>

int wmain(int argc, wchar_t ** argv)
{
    HANDLE h;
    FILESYSTEM_STATISTICS * fs;
    BYTE buffer[32768];
    DWORD dw;

    h = CreateFile(argv[1], 0, 
        FILE_SHARE_READ | FILE_SHARE_WRITE | FILE_SHARE_DELETE, 
        NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_FLAG_BACKUP_SEMANTICS, NULL);

    if (h == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        printf("CreateFile: %u\n", GetLastError());
        return 1;
    }

    if (!DeviceIoControl(h, FSCTL_FILESYSTEM_GET_STATISTICS, NULL, 0, buffer, sizeof(buffer), &dw, NULL))
    {
        dw = GetLastError();
        CloseHandle(h);
        printf("DeviceIoControl: %u\n", dw);
        if (dw == ERROR_INVALID_FUNCTION)
        {
            printf("This probably means the specified file or directory is not on an NTFS volume.\n");
            printf("For example, this happens if you specify a file on a CD-ROM.\n");
        }
        return 1;
    }

    CloseHandle(h);

    fs = (FILESYSTEM_STATISTICS *)buffer;
    printf("Filesystem type: %u\n", fs->FileSystemType);

    if (fs->FileSystemType == FILESYSTEM_STATISTICS_TYPE_NTFS)
    {
        printf("The file or directory is on an NTFS volume.\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("The file or directory is not on an NTFS volume.\n");
    }
    return 0;
}
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Awesome! Thank you! –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Oct 15 '12 at 6:28
//Get all the drives on the local machine.
DriveInfo[] allDrives = DriveInfo.GetDrives();

//Get the path root.
var pathRoot = Path.GetPathRoot(absoluteFilePath);
//Find the drive based on the path root.
var driveBasedOnPath = allDrives.FirstOrDefault(d => d.RootDirectory.Name == pathRoot);
//Determine if NTFS  
var isNTFS = driveBasedOnPath != null ? driveBasedOnPath.DriveFormat == "NTFS" : false;
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That won't help me if the target path traverses a mounted device. –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Oct 13 '12 at 15:50

You want to look into the DriveInfo class. Something like:

var drive = DriveInfo.GetDrives().SingleOrDefault(di => di.Name.StartsWith("C"));
Console.WriteLine("C drive: {0}", drive.DriveFormat);

drive.DriveFormat will output the format, so you can check to see if it's NTFS.

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That won't help me if the target path traverses a mounted device. –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Oct 13 '12 at 15:55
using System.Management;

string logDisk= "c:";
string CIMObject = String.Format("win32_LogicalDisk.DeviceId='{0}'", logDisk);
using(ManagementObject mo = new ManagementObject(CIMObject))
{
    mo.Get();
    Console.WriteLine(mo["FileSystem"]);
}
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That won't help me if the target path traverses a mounted device. –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Oct 13 '12 at 15:53

The Win32 GetVolumeInformation() API will give you the name of the filesystem for a given root directory path.

Note that this will follow symbolic links/joins, and return information for the target of such links.

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