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I've got an existing Visual Studio project that was setup as a "Web Site" project. You can create projects like this by going to File->New Web Site. This is a different project type than a "Web Application Project".

I'd like to mix in some TypeScript on this project. However, I can't figure out how to instruct Visual Studio to "build" my .ts files and generate .js files. I've got the VS2012 TypeScript plugin, and I'm able to a create a TypeScript project, as outlined here. That project works fine, but that's more along the lines of a "Web Application Project". It's a different project type than a "Web Site Project".

Also, when I create .ts file, inside that file the editor gives me TypeScript syntax highlighting and intellisense. But again, I can't figure out how to get it to compile the TypeScript to JavaScript.

A little help?

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There's also information available at stackoverflow.com/questions/12680486/… –  Jedidja Aug 2 '13 at 12:25
    
This should be merged with the question above. This question has a really good answer, it'd be a shame to let it go to waste. The other question has more votes though. –  Johannes Rudolph Apr 27 at 10:24
    
An ASP.NET MVC app is going to be a "Web Application Project," not a "Web Site Project." In my question I was asking about the latter, not the former; in the question @Jedidja reference, the questioner as asking about the latter, not the former. They are related but different questions. A good editor could certainly figure out how to merge while retaining all the details for both questions. –  Josh Apr 28 at 16:16
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6 Answers

This one has been a bit of a moving target - but only because the TypeScript team have been improving how it all works. I have tried to cover as many scenarios as possible below, from the newest to the oldest.

I have taken these abbreviated notes from my much longer answer about adding TypeScript to an existing project.

VS 2013 / 0.9.5

If you are using the Visual Studio Extension for 0.9.5 or better along with Visual Studio 2013 you should find that it will automatically configure everything as soon as you add the first TypeScript file.

Auto TypeScript-isation didn't work?

The automatic config only adds a few lines - you could do that manually:

  <ItemGroup>
    <TypeScriptCompile Include="Scripts\app.ts" />
  </ItemGroup>
  <Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath32)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\TypeScript\Microsoft.TypeScript.targets" Condition="Exists('$(MSBuildExtensionsPath32)\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v$(VisualStudioVersion)\TypeScript\Microsoft.TypeScript.targets')" />

VS 2012 / 0.9.x

The following project file configuration should work:

  <ItemGroup>
    <TypeScriptCompile Include="app.ts" />
  </ItemGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)' == 'Debug'">
    <TypeScriptTarget>ES5</TypeScriptTarget>
    <TypeScriptRemoveComments>false</TypeScriptRemoveComments>
    <TypeScriptSourceMap>true</TypeScriptSourceMap>
    <TypeScriptModuleKind>AMD</TypeScriptModuleKind>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)' == 'Release'">
    <TypeScriptTarget>ES5</TypeScriptTarget>
    <TypeScriptRemoveComments>true</TypeScriptRemoveComments>
    <TypeScriptSourceMap>false</TypeScriptSourceMap>
    <TypeScriptModuleKind>AMD</TypeScriptModuleKind>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <Import Project="$(VSToolsPath)\TypeScript\Microsoft.TypeScript.targets" Condition="Exists('$(VSToolsPath)\TypeScript\Microsoft.TypeScript.targets')" />

Even older set up?

I have found the most reliable way to add TypeScript to an existing project is to add the following to the project file:

<ItemGroup>
    <AvailableItemName Include="TypeScriptCompile" />
 </ItemGroup>
 <ItemGroup>
    <TypeScriptCompile Include="$(ProjectDir)\**\*.ts" />
 </ItemGroup>
 <Target Name="BeforeBuild">
    <Exec Command="&quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&quot;  @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" IgnoreExitCode="true" />
 </Target>

You can add optional flags here too - such as --module amd:

    <Exec Command="&quot;$(PROGRAMFILES)\Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\0.8.0.0\tsc&quot; --module amd  @(TypeScriptCompile ->'&quot;%(fullpath)&quot;', ' ')" IgnoreExitCode="true" />
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The only config file I'm aware of with Web Site projects is the web.config. Is that what you're referring to? If so, where in the web.config does this XML snippet go? If not, where is the "project file" that I need to add this to, and where inside that file does this go? Thanks! –  Josh Oct 15 '12 at 12:34
    
@JoshuaBeall the project file is the .csproj file. If you pull up the context menu, there is an option to Unload Project. Once you've done that, you can pull up the context menu again to edit the project file (which is just XML under the hood). When you are finished, it is back to the context menu to Reload Project. –  Steve Fenton Oct 15 '12 at 13:14
    
where is this .csproj file? It is not in the root of my Web Site project. As I mentioned, the only config file I'm aware of is the web.config file. Does Visual Studio put a .csproj file in some other folder? If so, where? –  Josh Oct 15 '12 at 17:11
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/3365940/… makes it sound like there is no csproj for a web site project. –  Josh Oct 15 '12 at 17:13
1  
@MrGrok - ah yes - I took this from a project I am working on. target ES5 is to override the default of ES3 - the only time you would use that is if you weren't worried about IE8 and below and needed to use getters and setters. –  Steve Fenton Oct 18 '12 at 8:12
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As of version 0.8.2, released 21-Jan-2013, the VS2012 TypeScript plug-in supports compile-on-save without using WebEssentials. Go to Tools > Options > Text Editor > TypeScript > Project section and check the "Automatically compile..." box.

If you want to compile all your .ts files into a single .js file as part of your build process (which you probably should), then make sure the app.ts script has <reference>s to all the files that should be included, and add the following pre-build step to your project:

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\TypeScript\tsc.exe" --out app.js app.ts

(Specifying the --out parameter tells tsc to include all referenced files.)

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+1 because The Rendle speaks truth. –  Steve Fenton Aug 2 '13 at 20:52
    
For me, this was located inside a v1 folder inside the TypeScript folder. Horrible to integrate if the version changes. Is there a way around that problem? –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Apr 5 at 23:10
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Visual Studio now supports "compile on save" for TypeScript files. I'm using Visual Studio 2013 Update 2, and I can turn this on in a Web Site project by going to Tools -> Options -> Text Editor -> TypeScript -> Project, and checking the box "Automatically compile TypeScript files which are not part of a project." I don't know why it's labeled like this, because it is clearly compiling files which are part of my project...

Many of the other answers to this are not applicable to Web Site Projects, because you can't hook into the build process. With a Web Site Project, there is no csproj or vbproj file, as the build is handled by IIS, not Visual Studio.

If you're using a Web Site Project, and "compile on save" doesn't work for you, there are only a few alternatives:

1) Use the command line TSC compiler to manually compile your code.

2) Create a custom tool for manually compiling your files. You can configure this for use in Visual Studio.

3) Create an "on-demand compilation" .aspx page that will compile the TypeScript and return it as JavaScript.

4) Use the TypeScript Compile JavaScript project to automatically your code in the browser. This gives you the "on-demand compilation" that normally comes with Web Site Projects.

Before "compile on save" was working in VS, I was using the TypeScript Compile. Now I'm happily using "compile on save."

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This really pisses me off. You can't compile code for a scripting language, primarily (only?) used for website development - in a Website project? I really don't know why I even bother with Microsoft anymore to be honest. –  Arrow Oct 25 '12 at 9:51
    
@Steve Fenton's answer below is really useful. –  Jedidja Aug 2 '13 at 12:19
    
@Arrow, things have improved since your comment in 2012. I updated my answer to clarify that compilation now happens automatically. –  Josh Jun 9 at 18:13
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Since there's no project file, you may have to revert to "manually" running the TypeScript compiler.

Open a Visual Studio Command Prompt (Start -> Programs -> Microsoft Visual Studio 20xx -> Visual Studio Tools -> Developer Command Prompt).

Run: tsc your_input_file.ts --target ES5

To supply multiple .ts files, use a text file with the @args_file_name parameter.

When you get tired of that, put it all in a batch file.

When you get tired of using a batch file, convert your app to a Web Application and alter the .proj file as per Sohnee's answer.

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Josh, I am using Visual Studio 2012 Express for Web and what I've realized is that every time you save the .ts file, it automatically generates the .js.

Check your .ts folder each time you save a file and confirm if this is not happening to you too.

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It is now, but it was not when I posted my question back in 2012. Progress! –  Josh Aug 21 '13 at 18:54
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Check if your .ts files in properties are associated with TypeScriptCompiler.

Keep in mind that opening a .ts file in VS into so called virtual project is not the same as having a reference to file in VS web project. First one will not let you set build action on it. While another one will.

PS. Get Web Essentials VS add-on to get transformations on file save, texteditor ts/js split and built-in minimizer.

Edit: Yeah, I didn't notice there is no such build action available with other projects at start... But hey, I pushed Sohne into right direction.

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Even with Web Essentials, TypeScript fails to compile most of the time for me. –  Arrow Oct 25 '12 at 9:53
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