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I want to work with an immutable indexed multidimensional array. The structure that makes sense is a Vector of Vectors.

scala> val v = Vector[Vector[Int]](Vector[Int](1,2,3), Vector[Int](4,5,6), Vector[Int](7,8,9))
v: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Vector[Int]] = Vector(Vector(1, 2, 3), Vector(4, 5, 6), Vector(7, 8, 9))

It would be nice to create an empty array just by specifying the dimensions, like you can with Array.ofDim.

scala> a = Array.ofDim[Int](3,3)
a: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(0, 0, 0), Array(0, 0, 0), Array(0, 0, 0))

However, there is no Vector.ofDim, function, and I can't find an equivalent.

Is there an equivalent of Array.ofDim for immutable objects? If not, why not?

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It's for a program that solves Sudoku puzzles. A partial solution is represented as an nxn array of Option[Int]. Given a partial solution p, the program can hypothesize another one p' by putting integers into the array. Because each p may generate multiple p' s, I want each partial solution to be immutable. My options appear to either be 1) represent the numbers with a private Array 2) represent the numbers with a Vector. (2) seems more in the functional style, but creating Vectors of Vectors is awkward. –  W.P. McNeill Oct 12 '12 at 22:06
    
You can represent multi-dimensional arrays/lists using single dimensions. –  pedrofurla Oct 13 '12 at 0:17
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Prepare for some fun trying to update cells in a multi-dimensional Vector. Probably easiest is to have a utility method: def update[T](v: Vector[Vector[T]])(c1: Int, c2: Int)(newVal: T) = v.updated(c1, v(c1).updated(c2, newVal)). Or if you need higher dimensions copy and paste from stackoverflow.com/a/12612908/770361. –  Luigi Plinge Oct 13 '12 at 0:33
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Each standard collection class has a companion object with factory methods, including fill. By example:

Vector.fill(3, 3)( 0 )

See http://www.scala-lang.org/api/2.9.1/scala/collection/immutable/Vector$.html

Note that for some reason the scala doc is broken in 2.9.2, and the fill method and friends are missing (this is why I linked the scaladoc for version 2.9.1)

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There is a creation method called tabulate that lets you set the contents based on the index:

scala> Vector.tabulate(3,3){ (i,j) => 3*i+j+1 }
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]] =
Vector(Vector(1, 2, 3), Vector(4, 5, 6), Vector(7, 8, 9))

If you just need zeros (or some other constant), you can use fill instead:

scala> Vector.fill(3,3)(0)
res1: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]] =
Vector(Vector(0, 0, 0), Vector(0, 0, 0), Vector(0, 0, 0))
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You can use fill:

scala> Vector.fill( 3 )( Vector.fill(3)(0) )
res1: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int]] = 
        Vector(Vector(0, 0, 0), Vector(0, 0, 0), Vector(0, 0, 0))
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