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Is there a way to tighten this up so that there is only 1 line in the body?

private int _ProjectGuidToId (Guid guid)
{
    ProjectEntity res = _dbt.ProjectEntity
                            .Where(r => r.ProjectGUID == guid.ToString())
                            .First();
    return res.Id;
}

In other words, how do I return 1 value (Id) from 1 row from the database using LINQ in one line of code?

Thanks.

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4  
Remove the newlines, perhaps? –  user529758 Oct 12 '12 at 22:15
1  
Isn't that already doing it? Or do you want return _dbt.ProjectEntity.Where(r => r.ProjectGUID == guid.ToString()).First().Id? –  Chris Sinclair Oct 12 '12 at 22:15
1  
Why are you doing guid.ToString()? is ProjectedGUID not a Guid? if not, then it's a rather badly named property... –  Trevor Pilley Oct 12 '12 at 22:21
    
@TrevorPilley in the database, it is a string. –  user290043 Oct 12 '12 at 22:24
    
@Eric in that case, I'd suggest you either change the property name or the column to a uniqueidentifier. –  Trevor Pilley Oct 12 '12 at 22:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about something like this?

private int _ProjectGuidToId (Guid guid)
{
    return _dbt.ProjectEntity.First(r => r.ProjectGUID == guid.ToString()).Id;
}
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Wow, that was simple. Thank you much! :) –  user290043 Oct 12 '12 at 22:17
1  
You don't need the where clause. See my answer. –  Metro Smurf Oct 12 '12 at 22:21
1  
Actually, I forgot that .First can take a predicate as well. @MetroSmurf I ninja'd your answer already :-) –  Platinum Azure Oct 12 '12 at 22:21
    
Stealthy. From here on out, you shall be known as PlatinumNinjaSmurf. –  Metro Smurf Oct 12 '12 at 22:27
    
Excellent. I am duly honored. (Thank you for reminding me of the .First overload which takes a predicate.) –  Platinum Azure Oct 12 '12 at 23:12

The where clause can be eliminated by using the First's predicate clause:

return _dbt.ProjectEntity.First( r => r.ProjectGUID == guid.ToString() ).Id;
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Very cool. Thanks for helping a newbie out with 'tricks' like these. :) –  user290043 Oct 12 '12 at 22:21

You just need to add the .Id to the end of the first line and return the single line.

I would, however, discourage this. A single unreadable line is in my opinion worse code than two readable lines.

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Thank you for the caution. I am new, for sure, and appreciate any input. –  user290043 Oct 12 '12 at 22:23
1  
My view is that unless it is really causing major problems with speed then make your code as readable as possible. If later on it comes to a point where your code really does need to be highly optimized either for source code size or speed for example, then look into doing things like this. –  Jon Taylor Oct 12 '12 at 22:31

The first will return the type of the object and no casting is needed (More Details.

Just do this line:

 return _dbt.ProjectEntity.Where(r => r.ProjectGUID == guid.ToString()).First().Id;

NOTE: If the query is not guaranteed to return one object an InvalidOperationException could be thrown!

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Thank you for the note. I am guaranteed that the GUID will be in the DB. :) –  user290043 Oct 12 '12 at 22:19
    
You are thinking of Single(), you would get an InvalidOperationException stating that the sequence contains no elements if there are no matches, however if there are multiple, you will get the First. –  Trevor Pilley Oct 12 '12 at 22:20
1  
Actually, it will throw a different exception corresponding to no instance being found. .FirstOrDefault is exception-free but returns null, leading to a NullReferenceException when accessing the .Id property. –  Platinum Azure Oct 12 '12 at 22:20
1  
No, the example is calling .First() which will throw an InvalidOperationException if there are none msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb291976.aspx - see the exceptions table. –  Trevor Pilley Oct 12 '12 at 22:24
    
@TrevorPilley thanks I was thinking FirstOrDefault in my head. –  Brad Semrad Oct 12 '12 at 23:11

use this if you want to force the list must contains one item. if list contains more than one item error may raised:

return _dbt.ProjectEntity.Single(r => r.ProjectGUID == guid.ToString()).Id;

and use this if not matter the length of the list:

return _dbt.ProjectEntity.First(r => r.ProjectGUID == guid.ToString()).Id;
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