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Division with really big numbers

I need to overload the / operator to work on two HugeInt objects which are defined simply as an array of 30 shorts. This is homework, btw, but I have been wracking my brain for days on this problem.

I have overloaded the * operator already:

HugeInt HugeInt::operator*(const HugeInt &op2){
HugeInt temp;
short placeProducts[hugeIntSize + 1][hugeIntSize] = {0};
short product;
int carry = 0;
int k, leftSize, rightSize, numOfSumRows;

leftSize = getDigitLength();
rightSize = op2.getDigitLength();

if(leftSize <= rightSize) {

    numOfSumRows = leftSize;

    for(int i = (hugeIntSize - 1), k = 0; k < numOfSumRows; i--, k++) {

        for(int j = (hugeIntSize - 1); j >= k; j--) {

            product = integer[i] * op2.integer[j] + carry;

            if (product > 9) {

                carry = product / 10;

                product %= 10;

            } else {

                carry = 0;
            }
            placeProducts[k][j - k] = product;
        }
    }

} else {
    numOfSumRows = rightSize;

    for(int i = (hugeIntSize - 1), k = 0; k < numOfSumRows; i--, k++) {

        for(int j = (hugeIntSize - 1); j >= k; j--) {

            product = integer[j] * op2.integer[i] + carry;

            if (product > 9) {

                carry = product / 10;

                product %= 10;

            } else {

                carry = 0;
            }
            placeProducts[k][j - k] = product;
        }
    }
}
sumProductsArray(placeProducts, numOfSumRows);

for(int i = 0; i < hugeIntSize; i++)
{
    temp.integer[i] = placeProducts[hugeIntSize][i];
}

return temp;}

But how do I overload the / op? My main problem isn't with the C++ code or syntax, but with my algorithm to divide. When I multiply I am able to do it digit by digit. I store each product (aka 1's digit of bottom times every digit above, then 10's digit time every num above using my carry algorithm) in my 2d array. Every time I get new product it is offset to the left by n + 1, which "multiplies" it by the required power of 10. Then I just sum up all the columns.

I can't for the life of me figure out how to code the long division method. Since I'm dealing with two arrays it has to be digit by digit, and I suspect it might be as easy as reversing the multiplication algorithm. Nested loops and subtraction? I would need a variable for the quotient and reminder? Is there a better method? I just need to be pointed in the right direction.

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marked as duplicate by DarenW, Justin Boo, Barmar, Emil Vikström, Toon Krijthe Oct 13 '12 at 10:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
There is a better method, but it is considerably harder to understand and get right. Long division for the purposes of this exercise should be fine (unless the instructor is trying to teach binary division). –  msw Oct 13 '12 at 0:49
1  
You learned it in grade school. Long division works. –  user85109 Oct 13 '12 at 0:54
    
Easier than long division is binary search. –  Nabb Oct 13 '12 at 4:35
    
I don't see how this is a duplicate question. The possible duplicate question DOES NOT answer my question. I still don't know how to implement the division algorithm. I am almost there but simply cannot understand how the difference between individual quotients can equal the total quotient. –  user1727490 Oct 13 '12 at 11:04

1 Answer 1

In computational division of integers, there are a few interesting results:

  • numerator < denominator implies quotient = 0
  • numerator == denominator implies quotient = 1
  • numerator > denominator, long division would be needed to determine quotient.

The first two conditions can be satisfied with a for loop. You could overload the less-than and equals relational operator to encapsulate this behavior.

For the long division, you will need your multiplication operator as well as overloaded less-than and subtraction operators, and an append digit member function to perform the operation.

It's brute force, but should get the job done.

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That's not what I am asking. It does help but I guess what my problem boils down to is the relationship between the divisor and the quotient. If a * b = c, we know that c / b = a, c / a = b, when a and b > 0. This makes sense and we can all agree that if 11 * 12 = 132, then 132 / 11 = 12 and 132 / 12 = 11, right? So if we break down the 11 and 12 into 10 + 1 and 10 + 2, how can I get the other expression from dividing the dividend by it's parts, i.e., (132 / 10 = 13 r 2) and (132 / 1 = 132) ... somehow I should be able to calculated 12 from 13r2 and 132, I just can't see how. –  user1727490 Oct 13 '12 at 10:59
    
You could do an exhaustive search for available factors that could comprise your quotient, but I think this would be expensive. The long division approach seems to be the most straightforward. I would take that route. The Knuth solution also looks interesting if you have the time to parse through the approach and try to understand it as an array approach, but you have C++, so why not try just overloading more operators? So much easier conceptually! –  caelumvox Oct 14 '12 at 0:13

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