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<!DOCTYPE HTML>

<html>
<head>
    <title> Javascript - stuff </title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    <!--
    function GetCountsAll( Wordcount, Sentancecount, Clausecount, Charactercount )
    {
        var TextString = document.getElementById("Text").innerHTML;
        var Wordcount = 0;
        var Sentancecount = 0;
        var Clausecount = 0;
        var Charactercount = 0;

        // For loop that runs through all characters incrementing the variable(s) value each iteration
        for (i=0; i < TextString.length; i++);
        if (TextString.charAt(i) == " " = true)
            Wordcount++;
        return Wordcount;

        if (TextString.charAt(i) = "." = true)
            Sentancecount++;                    
        Clausecount++;
        return Sentancecount;

        if (TextString.charAt(i) = ";" = true)
        Clausecount++;  
        return Clausecount;
    }


    -->
    </script>
</head>

<body>

    <div id="Text">
        It is important to remember that XHTML is a markup language; it is not a programming language. The language only describes the placement and visual appearance of elements arranged on a page; it does not permit users to manipulate these elements to change their placement or appearance, or to perform any "processing" on the text or graphics to change their content in response to user needs. For many Web pages this lack of processing capability is not a great drawback; the pages are simply displays of static, unchanging, information for which no manipulation by the user is required. Still, there are cases where the ability to respond to user actions and the availability of processing methods can be a great asset. This is where JavaScript enters the picture.
    </div>
    <input type = "button" value = "Get Counts" class = "btnstyle" onclick = "GetCountsAll()"/>
    <br/>       
    <span id= "Charactercount"> </span> Characters <br/>
    <span id= "Wordcount"> </span> Words <br/>
    <span id= "Sentancecount"> </span> Sentences <br/>
    <span id= "ClauseCount"> </span> Clauses <br/>

</body>
</html>

I am a student and still learning JavaScript, so excuse any horrible mistakes. The script is meant to calculate the number of characters, words, sentences, and clauses in the passage. It's, plainly put, just not working. I have tried a multitude of things to get it to work for me and have gotten a plethora of different errors but no matter what I can NOT get this to work. Please help! (btw i know i misspelled sentence)

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3  
Why is there a ; after the for statement? And you are not counting word - you are counting number of spaces in the string, which may not be the actual number of words. I reindented the code so that the problem is more promiscuous –  nhahtdh Oct 13 '12 at 3:19
    
Is this code written by you? –  zerkms Oct 13 '12 at 3:23
    
i know the spaces might not == the word count exactly,, and thats acceptable. –  user1742729 Oct 13 '12 at 3:24
    
and i tried it both ways (with and without the semicolon) - my major problem is that it is not outputting any answer,, and yes i wrote the code, like i said im still learning if tyhats why you asked,, actually why would you ask, just wondering –  user1742729 Oct 13 '12 at 3:25
1  
There are a bunch of mistakes in the code. First of all you're return statements are messed up. Conditions inside the ifs are wrong. And you can only return one value from the function (in case you're trying to return all the calculated sums, that's not allowed). –  Varun Achar Oct 13 '12 at 3:30
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3 Answers

Remove the semicolon from for (i=0; i < TextString.length; i++);. This breaks out of the loop.

Put brackets {} around
Sentancecount++;
Clausecount++;
so they are incremented each time the full stop is seen. Currently only Sentance is incremented each time. Clause is incremented at the end of the text.

I would also use brackets generally after ifs. It makes for readability and you can see what the code is doing if you can read it easily.

Next, you can only have want one return from the method. Have the first method call the secondary ones if that makes sense. Set it so you get some variables being given values, and then print them out.

hth

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thanks , that helped me get a little closer i think. –  user1742729 Oct 13 '12 at 3:56
    
apparently i cant upvote yet or youd both have one, thanks for the guidance. –  user1742729 Oct 13 '12 at 3:57
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You could use the split method of the string. Like this:

WordCount = TextString.split(' ').length;
Sentancecount = TextString.split('.').length;
Clausecount = TextString.split(';').length;
Charactercount = TextString.length;

This way, you don't need the for loop anymore.

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thanks, ill read up on that method –  user1742729 Oct 13 '12 at 3:55
    
I mean, is there more help you need with your question? –  nick_w Oct 13 '12 at 3:56
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Well, you have several issues here.

First, you want your for loops to have braces around the code you want to execute on each iteration.

for (i=0; i < TextString.length; i++) {
    if (TextString.charAt(i) == " " = true)
        Wordcount++;
}

(I'm assuming WordCount is supposed to be outside the loop (but it's incorrect either way))

Next, you're not handling those return values.

The way return works is that you can set a variable to the result of the function.

For example: function x() { return 2; }

var i = 1;
var q = i + x(); // Add the result of the function to i
alert(q); // This will display 3

So by calling return, you're sending that value back to where the function was called, but you're never using it.

Also, calling return immediately exits the function. You do not want this if you want to continue processing. I suggest that you create variables for each of the three values and store the results to that. Then after your processing in the script, you can the innerHTML of a div to the them.

Here's an example that may help you:

<html>
<head>
    <title>Example Javascript</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">

    function myFunction()
    {
        var text = Array(8).join(parseInt('')) + ' Batman!';
        var element = document.getElementById("result");

        element.innerHTML = text;
    }

    </script>
</head>
<body>
The output from our function is: <div id="result"> </div>
<br />
<button type="button" onclick="myFunction()">Run</button>
</body>
</html>

I would like to note that there are some really simple ways to solve this, but this seems like homework or at least a learning experience which is why I'm setting you on the right path rather than just giving you a straight answer. You're close! My advice is to just keep at it!

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