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Consider the following code:

var x = 0;
do {
    $.ajax({ 
    type: "POST", 
    url: someurl,
    dataType: 'xml',
    data: xmlString, 
    success: function(xml) { 
             x++;
    }

} while(x<10);

This would, of course, not work because thousands requests would be made to "someurl", so how would I go about changing this code in order to have the do while condition depend on the callback of the asynchronous HTTP request? In other words, how would I have the do-while loop continue only upon calling the request callback? So that only 11 iterations will be made, not thousands.

share|improve this question
    
Can you elaborate on the usage where you're applying this? – hjpotter92 Oct 13 '12 at 5:28
    
Well, I have a function that makes such an asynchronous request to a server that holds a database and its callback changes the value of a variable. And the request needs to repeat itself until that variable reaches a certain value. – Andrei Oniga Oct 13 '12 at 5:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could re-write it like this:

var x = 0;

function ajaxCall() {
    $.ajax({ 
    type: "POST", 
    url: someurl,
    dataType: 'xml',
    data: xmlString, 
    success: function(xml) { 
        x++;
        if (x<10) ajaxCall();
        else afterAjaxCall();
    }
}

function afterAjaxCall() {}

This way, the method calls itself when it succeeds ten times, then calls the 'after' method to continue with your other code.

share|improve this answer
var x = 0;
function callAjax() {
    $.ajax({  
        type: "POST",  
        url: someurl, 
        dataType: 'xml', 
        data: xmlString,  
        success: function(xml) {
            x++;
            if(x < 10){                     
                callAjax();
            }
        }
    }
}

The idea with this is that the success method first increments the counter, then checks it against the maximum number of calls. If it is less, another ajaxCall is made. Making the additional calls in the success method is the only way to prevent massive numbers of calls being made ($ajax is of course asynchronous and thus returns immediately)

share|improve this answer
var x = 0;
function A() {
    $.ajax({ 
    type: "POST", 
    url: someurl,
    dataType: 'xml',
    data: xmlString, 
    success: function(xml) { 
            x++;
            if(x<10)
            A();
    }

}
A();
share|improve this answer
1  
Code only or link only answers are not encouraged, you should add some explanatory text to your answer. – slugster Oct 13 '12 at 5:33
1  
@slugster Nevertheless, it's quite understandable to me :) – Andrei Oniga Oct 13 '12 at 5:34
    
@AndreiOniga That's not what counts - how understandable is it to everyone else? You've given an answer but not added value - how is your answer better than the others? You need to elaborate. (Note that your answer popped up in the low quality review queue, hence my comment). – slugster Oct 13 '12 at 5:36
    
I think the code is self-explanatory, unnecessary comments and explanations are worse than nothing at all if the code is understandable. – elclanrs Oct 13 '12 at 5:38
    
I agree with elclanrs. By the way, I posted the question, not the answer, slugster. :)) – Andrei Oniga Oct 13 '12 at 5:39

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