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I recently had a problem in one of my Bash scripts that was caused by unexpected output from one of the SSH commands it ran (due to an OS version upgrade). The problem actually resulted in a Bash syntax error, because I was expecting this output to contain only a numeric status code (from a remote script), which I then used in an arithmetic expression.

What surprised me, though, was that my Bash script continued executing after reporting the syntax error. This, despite the fact that I have the following line near the beginning of the file:

# Terminate script if any command fails
set -o errexit

Although a syntax error is obviously not the same as a failed command, it seems to me that that the former represents an even more serious error condition.

I know that you can use the -n parameter to check the syntax of a Bash script without actually executing any commands, but that would not have caught this problem anyway.

Here's an example which causes the error but does not exit:

#!/bin/bash
set -o errexit
x=")"
echo $(( x + 1 ))
echo still running

Is there any way to force a Bash script to terminate immediately after a syntax error in an arithmetic expression is detected during its normal operation?

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The quick answer is that you can trap it in this case by examining $?:

#!/bin/bash
x=")"
echo $(( $x + 1 ))
if [[ $? != 0 ]]; then
    echo >&2 "caught syntax error; aborting"
    exit $?
fi
echo success

However, this approach doesn't always work, e.g.

#!/bin/bash
x="-1"
(( x += 1 ))
if [[ $? != 0 ]]; then
    echo >&2 "caught syntax error; aborting"
    exit $?
fi
echo success

will result in:

caught syntax error; aborting

The bash(1) man page says:

The evaluation is performed according to the rules listed below
under ARITHMETIC EVALUATION.  If expression is invalid, bash
prints a message indicating failure and no substitution occurs.

but this hides some details of Bash's fairly peculiar behaviour with respect to syntax errors. For example,

#!/bin/bash
x=")"
if echo $(( $x + 1 )); then
    echo success
else
    echo failure
fi; echo "almost end of script"
echo "end of script"

results in:

./foo.sh: line 3: ) + 1 : syntax error: operand expected (error token is ") + 1 ")
end of script

By the way, set -o errexit doesn't seem to make any difference to any of this.

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