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I am coding in Objective-C / Cocoa-Touch for iPhone, and I was wondering, is it ever OK to not chain initializers? For instance, in my parent class I have three initializers that all need to be inherited from by child class. Is it OK in this instance to not chain? For instance, in this one class I have it set up like this:

- (id)initWithGraphic:(Graphic*)graphic size:(CGSize)size
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:CGRectZero];
    if (self) 
    {
      ...

    }
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithGraphic:(Graphic*)graphic maximumDimension:(CGFloat)maximumDimension
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:CGRectZero];
    if (self) 
    {
      ...

    }
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithGraphic:(Graphic*)graphic 
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:CGRectZero];
    if (self) 
    {
      ...

    }
    return self;
}

So essentially I don't have one designated initializer because it's tough for me to chain them together, I basically have three.

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I don't quite understand the question--however you always need to call one of your superclass's parent initializers so that can in turn eventually call -init –  nielsbot Oct 13 '12 at 7:19
    
Nielsbot, I believe that is the answer to the question: No, it not OK: Your initializer must call one of its parent class initializers. –  Kris Van Bael Oct 13 '12 at 7:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Short answer: if you want your code to be understandable and maintainable, then you must always call super's designated initializer.

Long answer...

The -[NSObject init] method is documented to do nothing:

The init method defined in the NSObject class does no initialization; it simply returns self.

Therefore in theory you're not required to call it. In practice it's better to call it because it makes your code more uniform (and therefore easier to understand), and less likely to break if you decide to change a class to inherit from something other than NSObject.

If you have some inheritance chain MyGrandparent > MyParent > MyObject, and you are the implementer of both MyParent and MyObject, and MyParent doesn't override all of MyGrandparent's initializers, then you could directly call one of MyGrandparent's non-overridden initializers from your MyObject initializers. But again, this is a bad idea. It will be confusing when you or someone else has to revisit the code later, and likely to break if you change the implementation of MyParent later.

Also, if you're creating multiple initializers, you need to learn about designated initializers here and here. It's important to pick one of your initializers as the designated initializer, and make sure all subclass initializers call the superclass's designated initializer directly. Otherwise, you're likely to end up creating infinite recursion. I explained this problem thoroughly in this answer and this answer.

UPDATE

In your example, you could set up a designated initializer like this:

static CGFloat const kMaximumDimensionNone = 0; // or NAN if 0 is a valid max dimension
static CGSize const kSizeNone = { 0, 0 }; // or NAN, NAN if 0x0 is a valid size

- (id)initWithGraphic:(Graphic *)graphic size:(CGSize)size maximumDimension:(CGFloat)maximumDimension {
    if (self = [super init]) {
        _graphic = graphic;
        if (!CGSizeEqualToSize(size, kSizeNone)) {
            [self configureWithSize:size];
        }
        else if (maximumDimension != kMaximumDimensionNone) {
            // Use if(!isnan(maximumDimension)) instead if you use NAN as the placeholder
            [self configureWithMaximumDimension:maximumDimension];
        }
        else {
            [self configureWithDefaultDimensions];
        }
    }
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithGraphic:(Graphic *)graphic {
    return [self initWithGraphic:graphic size:kSizeNone maximumDimension:kMaximumDimensionNone];
}

- (id)initWithGraphic:(Graphic *)graphic size:(CGSize)size {
    return [self initWithGraphic:graphic size:size maximumDimension:kMaximumDimensionNone];
}

- (id)initWithGraphic:(Graphic *)graphic maximumDimension:(CGFloat)maximumDimension {
    return [self initWithGraphic:graphic size:kSizeNone maximumDimension:kMaximumDimensionNone];
}

You don't have to expose the designated initializer in the public header file. You can add a a separate header file exposing the designated initializer for subclasses to import. For example, Apple does this with the UIGestureRecognizerSubclass.h header, which declares the ForSubclassEyesOnly category on UIGestureRecognizer.

Or you could expose the configureWith... methods to your subclasses, and maybe you wouldn't even need to have them override the initializers.

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Thanks for the response as usual Rob. I wasn't clear in my question, what I meant was, if you have multiple initializers in one class, is it OK to not chain them together as long as each one of them calls the super classes initializer? –  CoDEFRo Oct 13 '12 at 7:51
    
@CoDEFRo Perhaps you could edit your question to include an example of what you're considering. –  rob mayoff Oct 13 '12 at 7:52
    
I edited it Rob, sorry about that. –  CoDEFRo Oct 13 '12 at 8:08
    
@CoDEFRo I've updated my answer. –  rob mayoff Oct 13 '12 at 8:23
    
Thanks, appreciate it. –  CoDEFRo Oct 13 '12 at 8:29

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