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Guys, please help me out here.

I want to know the CPU Utilization of a process & all the child processes it has invoked during a particular period of time in Linux. (This time period i know - i know when to start measuring & when to stop).

To be more specific, here is my use-case :-

There is a process which waits for the request from the user to execute the programs. To execute the programs, this process invokes child processes (maximum limit of 5 at a time) & each of this child process executes 1 of these submitted programs (let's say user submitted 15 programs at once). So, if user submits 15 programs, then 3 batches of 5 child processes each will run. Child processes are killed as soon as they finish their execution of the program.

Here, i want to know about % CPU Utilization for the parent process & all its child process during the execution of those 15 programs.

Is there any simple way to do this using top command or any other command. (or any tool i should attach to the parent process)

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can find this information in /proc/PID/stat where PID is your parent process's process ID. Assuming that the parent process waits for its children then the total CPU usage can be calculated from utime, stime, cutime and cstime:

utime %lu

Amount of time that this process has been scheduled in user mode, measured in clock ticks (divide by sysconf(_SC_CLK_TCK). This includes guest time, guest_time (time spent running a virtual CPU, see below), so that applications that are not aware of the guest time field do not lose that time from their calculations.

stime %lu

Amount of time that this process has been scheduled in kernel mode, measured in clock ticks (divide by sysconf(_SC_CLK_TCK).

cutime %ld

Amount of time that this process's waited-for children have been scheduled in user mode, measured in clock ticks (divide by sysconf(_SC_CLK_TCK). (See also times(2).) This includes guest time, cguest_time (time spent running a virtual CPU, see below).

cstime %ld

Amount of time that this process's waited-for children have been scheduled in kernel mode, measured in clock ticks (divide by sysconf(_SC_CLK_TCK).

See proc(5) manpage for details.

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Might not be the exact command. But you can do something like below to get cpu usage of various process and add it.

#ps -C sendmail,firefox -o pcpu= | awk '{s+=$1} END {print s}'

/proc/[pid]/stat Status information about the process. This is used by ps and made into human readable form.

Another way is to use cgroups and use cpuacct.

http://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/cgroups/cpuacct.txt

https://access.redhat.com/knowledge/docs/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Resource_Management_Guide/sec-cpuacct.html

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And of course you can do it in hardcore-way using good old C

find_cpu.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define MAX_CHILDREN 100

/**
 *  System command execution output
 *    @param <char> command - system command to execute
 *    @returb <char> execution output
 */
char *system_output (const char *command)
{
  FILE *pipe;
  static char out[1000];
  pipe = popen (command, "r");
  fgets (out, sizeof(out), pipe);
  pclose (pipe);
  return out;
}

/**
 *  Finding all process's children
 *    @param <Int> - process ID 
 *    @param <Int> - array of childs
 */
void find_children (int pid, int children[])
{
  char empty_command[] = "/bin/ps h -o pid --ppid ";
  char pid_string[5];

  snprintf(pid_string, 5, "%d", pid);

  char *command = (char*) malloc(strlen(empty_command) + strlen(pid_string) + 1);
  sprintf(command, "%s%s", empty_command, pid_string);

  FILE *fp = popen(command, "r");

  int child_pid, i = 1;
  while (fscanf(fp, "%i", &child_pid) != EOF)
  {
    children[i] = child_pid;
    i++;
  }
}

/**
 *  Parsign `ps` command output
 *    @param <char> out - ps command output
 *    @return <int> cpu utilization
 */
float parse_cpu_utilization (const char *out)
{
  float cpu;
  sscanf (out, "%f", &cpu);
  return cpu;
}


int main(void)
{
  unsigned pid = 1;

  // getting array with process children
  int process_children[MAX_CHILDREN] = { 0 };
  process_children[0] = pid; // parent PID as first element
  find_children(pid, process_children);

  // calculating summary processor utilization
  unsigned i;
  float common_cpu_usage = 0.0;
  for (i = 0; i < sizeof(process_children)/sizeof(int); ++i) 
  {
    if (process_children[i] > 0) 
    {
      char *command = (char*)malloc(1000);
      sprintf (command, "/bin/ps -p %i -o 'pcpu' --no-headers", process_children[i]);
      common_cpu_usage += parse_cpu_utilization(system_output(command));
    }
  }
  printf("%f\n", common_cpu_usage);
  return 0;
}

Compile:

gcc -Wall -pedantic --std=gnu99 find_cpu.c

Enjoy!

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