Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to LINQ and am trying to create some data points from a table to graph. The three fields of importance in this table are the id, the time and the value. I am writing a query to get the average value over a set time for a chosen id. The LINQ I have written follows:

var value = (from t in _table
             where t.Id == id
                 && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
                 && t.Time <= intervalEndTime
             select t.Value).Average();

However this crashes at runtime with:

"The null value cannot be assigned to a member with type System.Decimal which is a non-nullable value type.."

At certain intervals there is no data so the SQL LINQ generates returns null, which I would liked to be COALESCED to 0 but instead crashes the application. Is there a way to write this LINQ query to be able to handle this properly?

The table definition to make things clearer:

[Serializable]
[Table(Name = "ExampleTable")]
public class ExampleTable
{
    [Column(Name = "Id")]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Column(Name = "Time")]
    public DateTime Time { get; set; }

    [Column(Name = "Value")]
    public int Value{ get; set; }
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think you want

var value = (from t in _table
             where t.Id == id
                && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
                && t.Time <= intervalEndTime
             select (int?)t.Value).Average()

This way, you get a double? back, whereas without the (int?) cast you need to get a double back, which cannot be null.

This is because of the signatures

double Enumerable.Average(IEnumerable<int> source)
double? Enumerable.Average(IEnumerable<int?> source)

Now, to get an average of 0 instead of null, you need to place the coalescing operator at the end

var value = (from t in _table
             where t.Id == id
                && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
                && t.Time <= intervalEndTime
             select (int?)t.Value).Average() ?? 0.0;


IMHO this is a pretty awful design of the Enumerable/Queryable class; why can't Average(IEnumerable<int>) return double?, why only for Average(IEnumerable<int?>)?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you that's done it. –  Magpie Aug 17 '09 at 11:56
    
just to assist others in this issue: if the query doesn't return any rows, nothing will really help. you just have to avoid running the query altogether. at least that was my experience. –  horace Aug 13 '12 at 16:56
    
@horace: That's simply not true. Average, Min, Max, Sum all work when the query matches no rows as long as the aggregate result is nullable. As you can see in the query above, you'll need a cast to enforce nullability when the expression to aggregate is not of a nullable type. (In the rare case it still doesn't work, you're probably dealing with a flaky LINQ provider. That's not LINQ's fault, and no provider I know of is that messed up.) –  Ruben Aug 14 '12 at 9:55

EDIT: Complete change :)

Okay, how about this:

var value = (from t in _table
             where t.Id == id
                 && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
                 && t.Time <= intervalEndTime
             select t.Value).DefaultIfEmpty().Average()

I believe that's logically what you want - changing {} to {0}, so making all averages achievable. I don't know if it'll do what you want in terms of SQL though.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry this doesn't work as Value is a non-nullable int. –  Magpie Aug 17 '09 at 10:17
    
Then remove the "m" from the 0 and it should work just fine. –  Andrew Hare Aug 17 '09 at 10:25
    
Ah, I'm approaching this incorrectly... hang on. –  Jon Skeet Aug 17 '09 at 10:27
    
Thanks but still no joy. Throws a "Could not format node 'OptionalValue' for execution as SQL." –  Magpie Aug 17 '09 at 10:41
    
+1 DefaultIfEmpty() takes away the problem of what to do if the where part of the linq reduces the set to no rows –  JK. May 12 '12 at 2:27

EDIT: Total Rework

Try casting the value to nullable first

var value = (from t in _table
         where t.Id == id
             && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
             && t.Time <= intervalEndTime
         select ((int?)t.Value) ?? 0).Average()
share|improve this answer
    
select t.Value ?? 0 doesn't compile as t.Value is a non-nullable int. –  Magpie Aug 17 '09 at 10:25
    
have you tried this edit? what is the result? –  Simon Fox Aug 17 '09 at 11:24
    
Yes, the complier tells me the left operand will never be null as Value is not nullable –  Magpie Aug 17 '09 at 11:26
    
Are you sure you have the brackets etc. correct? The cast to nullable is legit so Value should have already been evaluated... –  Simon Fox Aug 17 '09 at 11:35
    
Posted a working version; this one is close, though. –  Ruben Aug 17 '09 at 11:37

Try the following. It will simply skip all the null items returned by the query.

var value = (from t in _table
             where t != null
             where t.Id == id
                 && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
                 && t.Time <= intervalEndTime
             select t.Value).Average();

If you want to explicitly treat the null items as zero, then a simple use of the conditional operator should do the job:

var value = (from t in _table
             where t == null ||
                 (t.Id == id
                 && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
                 && t.Time <= intervalEndTime)
             select t == null ? 0 : t.Value).Average();
share|improve this answer
    
How can t be null, and be between intervalStartTime and intervalEndTime? I think his problem is that there are no records between certain start and end times, not that there are nulls in the table. –  Blorgbeard Aug 17 '09 at 10:33
    
Oh, t.Value vs. t.Time - I see. –  Blorgbeard Aug 17 '09 at 10:41
    
Thanks for the suggestion but still throws the same exception. –  Magpie Aug 17 '09 at 10:42
    
@Dominic: The first example should not through any excepts. I've now updated the second example to fix it (indeed, it was incomplete). –  Noldorin Aug 17 '09 at 10:46
    
Sorry again. Tried them both. They still throw "The null value cannot be assigned to a member with type System.Decimal which is a non-nullable value type.." Exception –  Magpie Aug 17 '09 at 11:02

Could you use a temp for the initial query?

E.g:

var temp = (from t in _table
            where t.Id == id
                && t.Time >= intervalStartTime
                && t.Time <= intervalEndTime
            select t.Value) ??  new List<int>() {0};
var value = temp.Average();

Not sure if this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.