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I am wondering if the following is possible. Lets say I have a code like this:

template <class NumberType>
struct Number
{
   NumberType value;

   void operator = (Number in_val)
   {
        value = in_val;
   }
}

So then I would be able to do something like:

Number<int> n1, n2;
n2.value = 5;
n1 = n2;
cout << "Value: " << n1.value << endl;

But this won't allow me to do the following:

Number<int> n1;
Number<double> n2;
n2.value = 5;
n1 = n2;
cout << "Value: " << n1.value << endl;

How to make this possible? Do I have to wrap this struct/class with another OR do I have to make some fancy recursion?

p.s. I have used C++ for some time now but never tried templates. So consider that I'm very new to templates.

-- EDIT -- Ok I got it correctly now. But another related question came.

template<class OtherNumType>
Number& operator *= ( const OtherNumType& in_value)
{
    value *= in_value;
    return *this;
}

This gives a compilation error. Why? What is the correct way?

share|improve this question
    
For the new content (after edit), it would be better to post a new question. (However, I think the reason why compilation fails is related to the type you use for OtherNumType. If that is a Number<T> for some T, you must change the function definition to value *= in_value.value.) –  jogojapan Oct 14 '12 at 0:23
    
No its just an Integer –  Deamonpog Oct 14 '12 at 5:50
    
What's the error you get? (Or have you posted a separate question?) –  jogojapan Oct 14 '12 at 6:33
    
binary '*=' : no global operator found which takes type 'NumberVector2D<NumberType>' (or there is no acceptable conversion) , but now it worked. I saw my fault. I was trying to do n1 *= 3 and it works. :) but cant do n1 *= n2. Now i see my fault. sorry for the false alarm. i should overload the operator to support this with a parameter type Number<OtherNumberType>. Now i understand. Thank you sir. :) –  Deamonpog Oct 14 '12 at 7:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When the template definition of Number<T> is considered by the compiler for any specific type T, the name Number (when used as a type name) is interpreted as Number<T>, whatever T may be at that point.

Hence, for Number<int>, your current template definition provides only for the assignment operator below:

void operator=(Number<int> in_val)

because Number is interpreted as Number<int> at that point.

In order to make the operator more flexible, you can turn it into a member template (a templated function in an already templated class):

template <class NumberType>
struct Number
{
  NumberType value;

  template <typename T2>
  Number &operator=(const Number<T2> &in_val)
  {
    value = in_val.value;
    return *this;
  }
};

Note how I have modified the operator not only to accept Number<T2> for any type T2, but also make it return *this and accept the argument as const reference – that is the most common and useful way to define the assignment operator.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for all the info. I have seen this kind of implementation (without the template thing) of the assignment operator in many places and also used this sometimes blindly. I understand why we return the saved value and why the "const" keyword is used. But i always wondered why we are returning this value as a reference. Would that be a bad thing? i mean if someone takes it in as pointer and change it, it would change the value inside the object, rite? this should be a separate question. but if u have any link, i will go there an learn :) Thankw very much to all of you :) –  Deamonpog Oct 13 '12 at 10:52
    
@Deamonpog We don't return the saved value; we return *this, a reference to the current object. The reason we do this by reference, rather than pointer, is that it makes it easy to make the assignment operation part of a chain of operations, e.g. if you have objects Number<int> n1,n2, you can do something like this: if ((n1 = f(x)) == n2). I.e. you make an assignment (of the result of f(x) to n1) and then immediately use it in a comparison (to n2). Had we returned a pointer, we would have to dereference it, and our code would be less intuitive. –  jogojapan Oct 13 '12 at 10:58
    
Yes, I understand that. What I meant was that someone can do a thing like Number<int> * p = &(n1 = f(x)); rite? –  Deamonpog Oct 13 '12 at 11:25
    
Yes, sure. Since we return a reference, you can do that. –  jogojapan Oct 13 '12 at 11:27
    
@Deamonpog: It is very rare to see RAW pointers in modern C++ code. –  Loki Astari Oct 13 '12 at 13:44

You can provide a template operator=

template<class OtherNumType>
Number<NumberType>& operator= ( const Number<OtherNumType>& in_val)
{
    value = in_val.value; // ok if the number types are implicitly convertable
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. –  Deamonpog Oct 13 '12 at 10:46

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