Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
zig zag scan algorithm

I have this matrix:

1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 A
B C D E F
0 1 2 3 4

And I want it printed in one line as following:

1 6 2 B 7 3 0 C 8 4 1 D 9 5 2 E A 3 F 4.

How is the easiest way to do that?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by KillianDS, Junuxx, philant, Peter O., Monolo Oct 13 '12 at 13:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
How are you storing it? What does your code look like? What have you tried? –  jbowes Oct 13 '12 at 11:18
    
How is your matrix represented? Please provide some code. –  Xyand Oct 13 '12 at 11:18
2  
print mat[0][0]; print mat[1][0]; print mat[0][1]; print mat[2][0]; ... print mat[3][4]; –  pmg Oct 13 '12 at 11:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

use a nested loop. outer loop is over the distance from (0,0)

inner loop over all valid combinations of i and j that sum up to the distance.

share|improve this answer
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char m[4][5] = { { '1', '2', '3', '4', '5' },
             { '6', '7', '8', '9', 'A' },
             { 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F' },
             { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4' } };

    for (int i = 0; i <= 3; ++i) {
        for (int j = 0; j <= i; ++j) {
            std::cout << m[i - j][j] << " ";
        }
    }

    for (int i = 4; i <= 7; ++i) {
        for (int j = i - 3; j <= 4; ++j) {
            std::cout << m[i - j][j] << " ";
        }
    }

    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I would suggest a vector<vector<char> > representation for the matrix(if I assume that you store chars in each cell). An important observation is that for each diagonal you have the sum of the i and j indices a constant and this sum increases by one for the diagonals.

Having noticed this you make an outer cycle over the sum and inner cycle over the x coordinate. Beware not to fall out of the matrix! Now the easiest c++ way to print the matrix would be:

vector<vector<char> > a;
for(unsigned sum = 0;  sum < a.size() + a[0].size(); ++sum) {
  for (unsigned j = 0; j <= sum && j < a[0].size(); ++j) {
    unsigned i = sum - j;
    if (i >= a.size()) {
      continue;
    }
    cout << a[i][j] << " ";
  }
}

One can optimize the cycle over j by changing the start value(so that the continue condition is never true) but the code would have been harder to understand. Another nit I did not fix on purpose is that an blank is printed even after the last element. This is yeat another check that needs to be added.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

If the matrix store in array like this :

#include <stdio.h> 
int main(void) { 
  char matrix[4][5] = {{'1','2','3','4','5'},
                       {'6','7','8','9','A'},
                       {'B','C','D','E','F'},
                       {'0','1','2','3','4'}};
  int cols = 5;
  int rows = 4;
  int i = 0;
  for( i = 0; i < cols + rows -2 ; i++){
    int j = 0;
    while(j <= i){
        int k = i-j;
        if(k < rows && j < cols){
            printf("%c ",matrix[k][j]);
        }
        j++;
    }
  }
} 

I just go through from 0 to total of indexes of row and columns ( in this case from 0 to 7) for each value of total index, print value with sum of column and row equal to current total index, if index is avaiable ( lesser than index of column and row), print it, else escape. For example:

0 - 00
1 - 10 01
2 - 20 11 02

Btw, it seems like need more loops than others

share|improve this answer
    
At least try to explain your code. –  KillianDS Oct 13 '12 at 12:07
for( int i = 0; i < matrix.cx; i++ ) {
    for( int j = 0; j < matrix.cy; j++ ) {
        std::cout << matrix[i][j] << ' ';
    }
    // comment following line to make matrix printed in one line
    std::cout << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think OP needs it printed diagonally in a funny way.. –  qdot Oct 13 '12 at 12:03
    
@qdot: it's not actually a funny way, it's a common zigzag scan pattern. –  KillianDS Oct 13 '12 at 12:05
    
@qdot: Common where? I guess DCT transforms are the only place where this is used in practice.. the whole question sounds very much like it's missing a [homework] tag. –  qdot Oct 13 '12 at 14:50
    
@qdot: the homework tag is deprecated. Next to that, yes it's most often used with DCT's, but DCT's and similar conversions are very common in signal processing/multimedia. –  KillianDS Oct 13 '12 at 18:04
1  
Thanks. I'm wondering thou.. zigzagging on asymmetric matrices? this has almost no mathematical sense in the DCT world. –  qdot Oct 13 '12 at 18:20

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.