Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I am trying to add a row of information to my listview but when I do it displays it weirdly. Like so:

enter image description here

I am using an for each loop like so:

foreach (Client c in clients)
{
   ListViewItem i = new ListViewItem();
   i.Content = new String[] { c.info.cid.ToString(), c.info.pc.ToString(),c.info.ip.ToString(), c.info.status.ToString() };
   list.Items.Add(i);
}

My Client class is using a struct to store the info

public struct Info
{
  public int cid;
  public string pc;
  public string ip;
  public string status;
}

I am also adding values to it:

info = new Info();
info.ip = "192.168.1.100";
info.pc = "Duncan";
info.status = "idle";
info.cid = 1;

Why is it displaying it weirdly? Could anyone help?

My ListView XAML:

<ListView Height="247" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="4,6,0,0" Name="list" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="319" Background="#FF454545" ItemsSource="{Binding}" SelectionMode="Multiple" Grid.Column="0">
   <ListView.View>
       <GridView AllowsColumnReorder="False">
       <GridViewColumn Header="ID" Width="30" />
       <GridViewColumn Header="Computer" Width="100" />
       <GridViewColumn Header="IP" Width="100" />
       <GridViewColumn Header="Status" Width="100" />
       </GridView>
    </ListView.View>
    </ListView>
share|improve this question
    
Can you show me XAML? –  jams Oct 13 '12 at 11:47
    
Added XAML To OP –  Duncan Palmer Oct 13 '12 at 11:51
    
Just an advice, you don't need to use .ToString() on the variables which are of type string. –  Fuex Oct 13 '12 at 12:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are some wrong things in this code. If you want to push data in a ListView using bindings, you have to have a valid ViewModel with properties to bind on. You have to define the bindings on you GridViewColumns.

Moreover, WPF doesnt know how to bind on fields, so you will need .NET properties for each data you want to display. Here is a very raw example for your case, it's not a realistic scenario but should help you get started :

Window.xaml

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
<ListView Height="247" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="4,6,0,0" Name="list" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="319" Background="#FF454545" ItemsSource="{Binding Clients}" SelectionMode="Multiple" Grid.Column="0">
    <ListView.View>
        <GridView AllowsColumnReorder="False">
            <GridViewColumn Header="ID" Width="30" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Id}" />
            <GridViewColumn Header="Computer" Width="100" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Computer}" />
            <GridViewColumn Header="IP" Width="100" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Ip}" />
            <GridViewColumn Header="Status" Width="100" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Status}" />
        </GridView>
    </ListView.View>
</ListView>
</Window>

MainWindow.xaml.cs

/// <summary>
/// Logique d'interaction pour MainWindow.xaml
/// </summary>
public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        DataContext = this;           
    }

    public IEnumerable<DummyClient> Clients
    {
        get
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                var info = new Info();
                info.ip = "192.168.1.100";
                info.pc = "Duncan";
                info.status = "idle";
                info.cid = 1;

                yield return new DummyClient(info);
            }
        }
    }
}

public class DummyClient
{
    public DummyClient(Info info)
    {
        Info = info;
    }

    public string Ip { get { return Info.ip; } }
    public string Computer { get { return Info.pc; } }
    public string Status { get { return Info.status; } }
    public int Id { get { return Info.cid; } }

    public Info Info
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
}

public struct Info
{
    public int cid;
    public string pc;
    public string ip;
    public string status;
}

Once again it's not really the way it should be done but this is a start. For exampe, DummyClient should implement INotifyPropertyChanged if you want two ways bindings to works.

share|improve this answer
    
So how would I had the tiems to the list? –  Duncan Palmer Oct 13 '12 at 12:30
    
You bind to an object collection. You don't have to create ListViewItems manually, the ListView ItemsGenerator does that for you. In this case, I bound the ListView ItemsSource on a basic DummyClient collection. You can just dump this code in a new project and adapt it to your needs, it should work. –  Sisyphe Oct 13 '12 at 12:31
    
Sorry could you elaborate, I'm a bit confused. –  Duncan Palmer Oct 13 '12 at 12:37
    
Wait nevermind, got it to work. Thanks alot :) –  Duncan Palmer Oct 13 '12 at 12:41
    
Okay :) ListView's DataContext is the MainWindow. It's the object that will be used as a Source for bindings. This is ensured by the "DataContext = this;" statement in the window constructor (it's not a good practice by the way). Now in xaml, ListView's ItemsSource is set to {Binding Clients}. It's means the ListView will be populated with object in Clients collection in the MainWindow. So if you want to add items to the ListView you just have to add objects to this collection. –  Sisyphe Oct 13 '12 at 12:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.