Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to determine whether the variable a user instantiates is present within an equation. I have the class declared as follows:

#ifndef EQUATION_H
#define EQUATION_H
#include "Expression.h"
#include "Shunt.h"
#include <string>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

class Equation
{
   public:
      Equation(string eq);//If an equation is invalid, throw an exception string
      Equation(const Equation& other);
      Equation& operator=(const Equation& other);
      ~Equation();
      int evaluateRHS();//If at least one variable does not have a value, throw an exception string
      int evaluateLHS();//If at least one variable does not have a value, throw an exception string
      void instantiateVariable(char name, int value);//If does not exist in the equation, throw an exception string
      int RHSdistanceFromLHS();//If at least one variable does not have a value, throw an exception string
      string original;
      map<char, int> variables;
   private:
      Expression* left;//Left side of the equals
      Expression* right;//Right side of the equals
};
#endif

and implement instantiateVariable in the following:

void Equation::instantiateVariable(char name, int value)
{

  short firstLen = left->equationPart.length();
  short secLen = right->equationPart.length();

  bool exists = false;

  for(short i = 0; i < firstLen; i++)
  {
     if(left->equationPart[i] != name)
     {
        exists = false;
     }
     else
     {
       exists = true;   
     }
  }

  if(exists == false)
  {
    for(short i = 0; i < secLen; i++)
    {
       if(right->equationPart[i] != name)
       {
          exists = false;
       }
       else
       {
          exists = true;      
       }
    }    
  }  

    if(exists == false)
    {
        string er = "error";  //Not caught successfully. Terminates entire program.
        throw er;
    }


    variables[name] = value;

}

When called in the main function:

void testCase3()
{
        try
    {          
        Equation equation3("(y - (x + 3) ^ y) * 5 / 2 = log 20 - y");
        equation3.instantiateVariable('z',3);   
    }
    catch(string ex)
    {
        cout<<"Exception thrown"<<endl;
    }
}



int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
   testCase3();

}

the following error occurs:

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::string'
Aborted
share|improve this question
    
What compiler are you using? – Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 11:58
    
Using gcc compiler. – Zenadia Groenewald Oct 13 '12 at 12:02
    
There is a bug in your instantiateVariable for loops in the if equationPart[i] != name conditional: if name exists for say i==1 then exists is set to true; if name does not exist in i==2 then exists is reset to false. You should just have if(equationPart[i] == name) { exists = true } -- your initialization of exists to false takes care of the non-exists case. – reece Oct 13 '12 at 12:06
2  
aside, have you considered using std-exception classes, like cplusplus.com/reference/std/stdexcept/runtime_error ? it helps having all exceptions in the exception class hierarchy – Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 12:10
1  
which one? we should create an answer to solve this question. – Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 12:16

Please try to catch a const reference,

 catch(const string& ex) {}

see http://stackoverflow.com/a/2522311/1689451

share|improve this answer
    
That works, but it has to catch a string specifically. Probably should've mentioned that beforehand. – Zenadia Groenewald Oct 13 '12 at 11:56
    
All other exceptions thrown in other member functions work just fine, it's just this specific exception that doesn't seem to work. – Zenadia Groenewald Oct 13 '12 at 11:58
    
In my minimal working example, it just works fine -- i cannot see any problem with your code. Interesting! – Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 12:01
    
Indeed. In the other member functions, the exceptions are thrown in exactly the same way; I cannot understand why it won't work for this one case... – Zenadia Groenewald Oct 13 '12 at 12:09
    
@ZenadiaGroenewald: If you want a real answer then you need to reduce the code to the minimal compilable example that reproduces the problem (so we can run it). If you throw a std::string and then catch it (by value or reference) the code will work in all normal modern compilers. So either there is something you are not showing us (very likely) or your compiler is buggy (very very unlikely) or you have a very old compiler (unlikely). – Loki Astari Oct 13 '12 at 13:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.