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I am trying to lock a "boxed" object in a c# app, is this not possible?

    class t
    {
        System.Object t_x = new object();

        public t(int p)
        {
            t_x = p;

        }

        public void w()
        {
            lock (t_x)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
                {

                    {
                        t_x = ((int)t_x) + 1;
                        Console.WriteLine(t_x);
                        Thread.Sleep(1000);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

In another class I can start 2 threads:

        Thread b1 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(t1.w));
        b1.Start();
        Thread b2 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(t1.w));
        b2.Start();

However the portion is not locked. When I lock an arbitrary object (i.e. one created and not modified as object a=new object()) it locks well. Is boxing operation somehow "depromotes" my Object??

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2  
Why would you reassign the lock object within a lock block ? That defeats the purpose - since the whole point of synchronization is to avoid diff threads from trampling each other for a "shared" resource. – Gishu Aug 17 '09 at 11:19
    
I think the answer accepted it's not the good one – Cédric Boivin Aug 17 '09 at 11:26
    
There seems to be a recurring misnomer among the less experienced attempting .Net threading that the lock statement actually "locks" or protects the object on which the lock is called. They seem to miss the fact that the object is really a key to a locked block of code, the critical section. – Paul Sasik Aug 17 '09 at 12:23
up vote 16 down vote accepted

You need to create a separate lock object. The problem is that you re-assign t_x inside the loop. Assuming thread b1 gets inside the loop before b2 gets to the lock statement, b2 will be allowed inside the lock statement because, by that time, t_x will be a new object that does not have a lock on it.

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I think Monitor it's a better way to do that – Cédric Boivin Aug 17 '09 at 11:24
4  
@Cedric - read Lee's answer more carefully. The lock statement is exactly the same as using Monitor.Enter and Monitor.Exit. It's just a neater syntax for the same pattern. The issue is not whether to use lock or Monitor (not really a choice, as they are the same). The issue is to always pass the same object to serve as the lock, which is broken if you use a value type as it is boxed differently ever time you access it. – Daniel Earwicker Aug 17 '09 at 11:33

No, you can't do this - the lock block is shorthand for the following:

try(Monitor.Enter(lockObject))
{
    //critical section
}
finally
{
    Monitor.Exit(lockObject)
}

The documentation for Monitor.Enter states, "Use Monitor to lock objects (that is, reference types), not value types. When you pass a value type variable to Enter, it is boxed as an object. If you pass the same variable to Enter again, it is boxed as a separate object, and the thread does not block"

share|improve this answer
    
That the good way to do it. It's in the first exam 70-536 of microsoft certification. – Cédric Boivin Aug 17 '09 at 11:20
7  
This is the right answer - not because of the code snippet (the lock statement is fine) but because it mentions the difference between value and reference types. A value type is boxed again each time it is converted to the universal object base class, so it can't reliably act as the locking target. So this is better than the accepted answer. – Daniel Earwicker Aug 17 '09 at 11:35

You have to use a an extra object for the lock

object lockObj = new object();
public void foo()
{
    lock(lockObj)
    {
    //do stuff here
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The lock (t_x) call boxes an integer as a temporary object. Each call to lock(t_x) creates a New object and locking is useless.

(Lock expects an object and creates a NEW temporary object from the integer)

Just create a seperate lock object like said above by Femaref.

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If you really want (need?) to lock on the object, you can use a kind of wrapper :

public class IntWrapper
{
    public int Value{get;set;}
}

Or if you need to stay more abstract :

public class ObjectWrapper
{
    public Object Value { get;set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
While I wouldn't recommend doing it this way (just use another object to lock on), I don't understand the downvotes, as it is correct. – Jonathon Reinhart Apr 10 '12 at 15:14

If you want to recognise when the data is loaded and also if the use tries to use it before then, you can do something like this:

Have a boolean flag like you mention, but use a separate object to lock before accessing it to prevent cross-thread race conditions.

When the user tries to use the data, if it is not loaded (check the variable) you can add another event handler to the worker RunWorkerCompleted event, that will immediately do what the user wants when the data is loaded.

Example:

public class MyClass
{
    private bool dataIsReady = false;
    private object locker = new object();
    BackgroundWorker worker;

    public void Begin()
    {
        worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(worker_RunWorkerCompleted);
    }

    public void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            dataIsReady = true;
        }
    }

    public void UseTriesToUseData()
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            if (dataIsReady)
            {
                DoStuff();
            }
            else
            {
                this.worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(DoStuffCaller);
            }
        }
    }

    private void DoStuff()
    {
        // Do stuff with data.
    }

    private void DoStuffCaller(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.DoStuff();
    }
}
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