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I want to have a sub inside another sub,

sub a {
    sub b {
    }
}

I want to create a new instance of sub b for every call to sub a. Is there a way to do this in Perl?

When I run the code above and print the address of sub b in sub a I always get the same address for sub b like

sub a {
    print \&b;
    sub b{
    }
}

This link on Perl Monks says that we can do this, but I always see the same address for sub b.

Is there a way to create a new instance of sub b for every call to sub a?

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4  
Please explain what you want to achieve with multiple instances of the same subroutine. I am certain that Perl has a solution for you, but perhaps not in the fashion you have chosen –  Borodin Oct 13 '12 at 17:00

4 Answers 4

Named subroutines are only created once. You need to return an anonymous subroutine reference something like this:

sub a {
    my $counter = 1;
    return sub {
        return $counter++;
    }
}

my $c1 = a();
my $c2 = a();

# different references
print "c1 = $c1, c2 = $c2\n";

# each has a different counter
print "c1 ", $c1->(), "\n";
print "c1 ", $c1->(), "\n";
print "c2 ", $c2->(), "\n";
print "c2 ", $c2->(), "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
This won't create a new instance of the anonymous subroutine. Only the closure is different –  Borodin Oct 13 '12 at 17:00
    
But this is a better example of a closure than anything else –  vol7ron Oct 13 '12 at 17:00
    
@Borodin: In formal computer science, a "closure" consists of a "subroutine" (or "procedure" or "function") plus an environment; but since few programming languages allow the programmer to make any serious distinction between a closure and its subroutine, or between a subroutine that closes over its lexical environment and one that doesn't, it's quite normal for programmers in a given language to refer to an entire closure as a "subroutine" (or "function" or whatnot, depending on the language). What's more, most languages' official definitions/standards do the same thing. –  ruakh Oct 13 '12 at 17:20
    
@ruakh: I agree with you partially, but have never seen a subroutine plus its upvalues referred to so casually. Can you offer a citation? What @adrianh said, and what I was hoping to correct, is "Named subroutines are only created once. You need to return an anonymous subroutine". –  Borodin Oct 13 '12 at 17:48
    
@vol7ron: I don't understand. This solution works best as an example of closures, or this solution is the best example of closures? –  Borodin Oct 13 '12 at 17:51
sub a {
    sub b{
    }
}

is basically the same as:

sub a {

}
sub b{
}

because named subroutines live in the symbol table hence they are global. you will need to return a reference to a subroutine.

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You could create a reference to an anonymous sub:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

sub a
{
    my($b) = @_;
    my $subref = sub { my($a) = @_; print "a = $a; b = $b\n"; return $a + $b; };
    &$subref(3);
    return $subref;
}

my $sub1 = a(10);
my $a10  = &$sub1(19);
my $sub2 = a(20);
my $a20  = &$sub2(20);
print "a10 = $a10; a20 = $a20; sub1 = $sub1; sub2 = $sub2\n";

Sample output:

a = 3; b = 10
a = 19; b = 10
a = 3; b = 20
a = 20; b = 20
a10 = 29; a20 = 40; sub1 = CODE(0x7ffc3c002eb8); sub2 = CODE(0x7ffc3c032eb8)
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1  
-1 for multiple bad practice Perl coding and appalling identifiers –  Borodin Oct 13 '12 at 16:51
1  
@Borodin: could you explain that? I am not noticing the bad practice you're speaking of; though, I do agree the variable naming could be improved –  vol7ron Oct 13 '12 at 17:10
    
@vol7ron: you should never use $a or $b as identifiers because they are built-in names used by the sort operator. And the use of & to call subroutines has been wrong for a very long time –  Borodin Oct 13 '12 at 17:25
    
@Borodin: yes, that is true about $a and $b but the OP used that, so to keep it in reference to the question, I think it'd be acceptable here. And I don't think I've ever heard that using & is wrong. Programmers should just know that &foo is not the same as &foo() or foo(), but I think he's using it correctly in the above. –  vol7ron Oct 13 '12 at 21:18
sub a {
    my $b = sub {
    };
    print \&$b;
}

or glob it:

sub a {
    local *b = sub {
    };
    print \&b;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, though I think \&$b is a pretty complicated way to spell $b. :-P –  ruakh Oct 13 '12 at 17:22
    
I agree, but didn't want to confuse –  vol7ron Oct 13 '12 at 21:14

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