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Given the following object literal how do I call c from within b?

Update 1 - missed one thing I use JQuery load, which changes the context:

var a = {
    b: function (e) {

        $o.load(path, function (e) { // need to call c from here });
    },
    c: function (e) { 
    }
};
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6 Answers 6

You should be able to do a.c() inside .b:

var a = {
    b: function(e) {
        a.c();
    },
    c: function(e) {}
};

a.b(); // calls c

Also, this will be bound to the a object which will allow you to access its properties using this.property:

b: function(e) {
    this.c();
},
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Sorry mate I missed one detail - I use JQuery load call, so I need to proxy the loaded event handler somehow... –  user1514042 Oct 13 '12 at 14:37
1  
note that this === a is only a sure thing if you call a.b() -directly. Assign the b function to another obj, or use it as a jQuery event handler, and this will change. –  Flambino Oct 13 '12 at 14:39

Try this:-

var a = {
b: function(e) {
    a.c();
},
c: function(e) {}
};

a.b(); 
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var a = {
    b: function (e) {
        a.c();
    },

    c: function (e) {
        // magic goes here
    }
};

a will be a closure so it's accessible in the functions (that is, a is defined in an wide, outer scope, which the narrower, inner scopes in each function inherit). Calling context is irrelevant; closures are formed when and where the functions are defined, so inside b, object a will always stay the same (unlike this, which can change).

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From the method b you may call c using this.c as long as they are on the same object. However for the function expression being passed to $o I would suggest you bind the this pointer of b to it. Thus you do:

var a = {
    b: function (e) {
        $o.load(path, function (e) {
            this.c();
        }.bind(this));
    },
    c: function (e) {
    }
};

Edit: The way you're creating and using this object is fragile. The this pointer may point to anything, such as when you unbind the methods or call it with a different context. Even using a.c isn't foolproof as other code may change a and when the method b is called a will point to something else.

I would do something like this:

var a = function (a) {
    a.b = function (e) {
        $o.load(path, function (e) {
            a.c();
        });
    };

    a.c = function (e) {
    };

    return a;
}({});

This code can not be tampered with and allows you to create private variables and closures.

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Perhaps I'm missing something but bind() doesn't change this of my loaded handler. I tried passing in a few different things including just a string but my this is always a html object. –  user1514042 Oct 13 '12 at 14:44
    
Perhaps you could show me your actual code. It works for me: jsfiddle.net/3bkzD –  Aadit M Shah Oct 13 '12 at 14:48
    
i'll take it from here thanks. –  user1514042 Oct 13 '12 at 14:50
    
I've found something more elegant than your solution being $,proxy. see my answer. –  user1514042 Oct 13 '12 at 15:20
    
JQuery proxy was used before browsers started natively supporting bind. I wouldn't prefer it over bind for any purpose. Native bind is approximately 90% faster than jquery.proxy. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 13 '12 at 22:53

Calling a function in jQuery with click()

maybe this question helps you too? It's pretty much the same idea. You can either write in B to activate function C, or you can do it when something happens (which is usually the reason to use jquery)

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The easiest solution which requires the minimum changes is to use jQuery.proxy():

var a = {
    b: function (e) {

        $o.load(path, $.proxy(function (e) { this.c(); }, this));
    },
    c: function (e) { 
    }
};
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$.proxy is similar to my method of using bind. In fact I would say that my method is better: jsperf.com/bind-vs-jquery-proxy/2 –  Aadit M Shah Oct 13 '12 at 23:00
    
Note however that this method still suffers from the same problem my method does. If the this pointer is changed (either by unbinding the methods or by changing the context using call or apply) then this will not point to the correct object. It's better to use my second method in this case. –  Aadit M Shah Oct 13 '12 at 23:03

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