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I was wondering if this can be done without using coroutines:

private void GetAll()
{
    if (_refreshA)
    {
        collA = new ObservableCollection(GetA<A>());
        _refreshA = false;
    }

    if (_refreshB)
    {
        collB = new ObservableCollection(GetB<B>(param))
        _refreshB = false;
    }

    if (_refreshC)
    {
        collC = new ObservableCollection(GetC<C>())
        _refreshC = false;
    }
}

CollA, CollB and CollC are used on UI thread. I need GetAll do be executed on different thread than UI, and I need GetA(), GetB(param) and GetC() to be executed one after another (not in parallel).

Result shoul be (if all 3 _refreshX are true):

create new thread
execute GetA() on new thread
wait for data to arrive
update UI collection with new data
create new thread
execute GetB(param) on new thread
wait for data to arrive
update UI collection with new data
create new thread
execute GetC() on new thread
wait for data to arrive
update UI collection with new data

Can this be done only with TPL, or I need to use coroutines also?

Edit: since I have had wrong impression that async await cannot be used on .NET 4, and svick and Adam Robinson pointed that out to me, I will try to achieve this using async await:

System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("Loading data started. Thread: {0}, {1}", System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode(), DateTime.Now));

IsBusy = true;
//Task.Factory.StartNew(() => GetDataBatch()); // UI is responsive
GetDataBatch(); // UI is not freezed (it is shown), but it is not responsive

System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("Loading data completed. Thread: {0}, {1}", System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode(), DateTime.Now));

private async Task GetAll()
{
    if (_refreshA)
    {
        collA = new ObservableCollection(await Task.Run(() => GetA<A>()));
        _refreshA = false;

        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("GetA items loaded. Thread: {0}, {1}", System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode(), DateTime.Now));

    }

    if (_refreshB)
    {
        collB = new ObservableCollection(await Task.Run(() => GetB<B>(param)));
        _refreshB = false;

        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("GetB items loaded. Thread: {0}, {1}", System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode(), DateTime.Now));
    }

    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10000);

    if (_refreshC)
    {
        collC = new ObservableCollection(await Task.Run(() => GetC<C>()));
        _refreshC = false;

        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("GetC items loaded. Thread: {0}, {1}", System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode(), DateTime.Now));
    }
}

The result is:

Loading data started. Thread: 9, 15-Oct-12 02:35:00
Loading data completed. Thread: 9, 15-Oct-12 02:35:00
GetA items loaded. Thread: 9, 15-Oct-12 02:35:00
GetB items loaded.  Thread: 9, 15-Oct-12 02:35:01
GetC items loaded.  Thread: 9, 15-Oct-12 02:35:11

Problem: UI is not freezed (view is shown), but it is not responsive also. For example, if I hover with mouse over a menu item, nothing happens. I have a template (busy template) that is shown during data loading, which should indicate to user what is going on. This template is not being shown, looks like it doesn't have enough CPU time to draw itself. If I use this code:

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => GetDataBatch()); // UI is responsive
//GetDataBatch(); // UI is not freezed (it is shown), but it is not responsive

then UI is responsive, busy data template is shown on screen, but the problems is that now all collection data belong to other thread than UI, so I cannot do any operation on them from UI thread.

How does async await handle this problem?

share|improve this question
    
Can you use C# 5? What exactly do you mean by coroutines? AFAIK, there is no support for them in .Net. –  svick Oct 13 '12 at 15:38
    
I cant use c#5 (I guess you meant .NET 4.5?), I need to keep Windows XP supported. Well, coroutines are not supported natively in .NET, but you can achieve something similar with yield iterator. –  Goran Oct 13 '12 at 21:54
1  
@Goran I believe you can't install AsyncTargetingPack on XP, because it requires VS 2012, but applications that are built using it can run on XP. –  svick Oct 14 '12 at 14:51
1  
@Goran: As svick says, you can use the AsyncTargetingPack in applications on XP machines (it's just another .NET 4 library...nothing special about it in that regard), you just can't develop on an XP machine since it requires VS 2012. Unless your dev box is XP (really?), you should be fine. –  Adam Robinson Oct 14 '12 at 17:11
1  
BTW, instead of using Thread.GetHashCode() (which is not guaranteed to be unique), you should use Thread.ManagedThreadId. –  svick Oct 15 '12 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using C# 5 async-await, this would be quite simple: run the code that needs to run on the background thread using Task.Run() and then await the Task, to asynchronously wait for it to complete and resume on the UI thread:

private async Task GetAll()
{
    if (_refreshA)
    {
        collA = new ObservableCollection(await Task.Run(() => GetA<A>()));
        _refreshA = false;
    }

    if (_refreshB)
    {
        collB = new ObservableCollection(await Task.Run(() => GetB<B>(param)));
        _refreshB = false;
    }

    if (_refreshC)
    {
        collC = new ObservableCollection(await Task.Run(() => GetC<C>()));
        _refreshC = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi svick. I am not quite clear how this code works. GetAll is marked as async, which means that this method should be executed asynchronously. I have edited my question to display code that I used to test this. It seems that GetAll is executed on the same thread as mu main thread (GetHashCode returns same value). However, UI is not freezed, it seems that await Task.Run(...) is allowing UI to update itself, but the problem is that UI is unresponsive. For example, I have a template on UI that should be executed during execution of GetAll method, but it seems like it doesnt have enough CPU time. –  Goran Oct 15 '12 at 0:41
1  
@Goran the asynchronous part is actually the GetA, GetB, and GetC calls. Your updated question is freezing because you've got the Thread.Sleep in the GetAll method, which actually runs on the main thread (which is the point of the whole thing). Try putting your sleeps and writelines inside GetA, GetB, and GetC themselves, and see what happens. –  Dax Fohl Oct 15 '12 at 17:45
    
@Goran also note that in all the answers so far, you won't be setting refresh=false until long after your if statement, so if you're calling GetAll in a timer, it could start executing GetA multiple times simultaneously. However solving that is probably a different question for a different day. –  Dax Fohl Oct 15 '12 at 19:21
    
Hi Dax. I am aware that Task.Factory.StartNew() is going asynchronously, however, since I am using await, in reality it is running in sync. Forget about Sleep command, I added it later. So, without the Sleep command, UI is not working correctly when GetAll is executed "normally", but it is working correctly when executed using Task.Factory.StartNew(...). However, then I experience problem with multiple threads using same data, so I wnoder is async await offer some new mechanism for handling this problem. If you do not believe me, run the same code, and try to show BusyIndicator on screen. –  Goran Oct 15 '12 at 19:40
void GetAll() {
    new Thread(() => {
        if (_refreshA) {
            var alist = GetA<A>();
            Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => { collA = new ObservableCollection<A>(alist); }));
            _refreshA = false;
        }

        if (_refreshB) {
            var blist = GetB<B>(param);
            Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => { collB = new ObservableCollection<B>(blist); }));
            _refreshB = false;
        }

        if (_refreshC) {
            var clist = GetC<C>();
            Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => { collC = new ObservableCollection<C>(clist); }));
            _refreshC = false;
        }
    }).Start();
}

Dispatcher.Invoke guarantees that the actions each complete before the method continues. Just for comparison, if you had wanted to do them in parallel you'd have needed to use Dispatcher.BeginInvoke instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not going to downvote this, but this is a prime candidate for the TPL. –  Adam Robinson Oct 14 '12 at 3:03
    
@Adam I'm interested in what the TPL answer would be; I've never used that before. The question has been open all day without a response, so I figured I'd offer something that works, even if not necessarily the most succinct option. –  Dax Fohl Oct 14 '12 at 3:36
    
I think using TPL would be slightly better here, because it's more efficient (it would use a thread pool thread). One way to switch to TPL would be simply replacing new Thread(lambda).Start() with new Task(lambda).Start(). –  svick Oct 14 '12 at 14:49

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