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I've been reading the book 'Programming from the Ground Up' to learn assembly programming in Linux. I'm having trouble solving one of the exercises at the end of chapter 3. The exercise says to modify the following program to use the address at the end of the set of data to terminate the loop. This is just a simple program to find the maximum number in a set of data, it currently just uses the number zero to mark the end of the data.

#PURPOSE:       This program finds the maximum number of a
#               set of data items.
#

#VARIABLES:     The registers have the following uses:
#
#       %edi    --    Holds the index of the data item being examined
#       %ebx    --    Largest data item found
#       %eax    --    Current data item
#
#       The following memory locations are used:
#
#       data_items    --    Contains the item data. A 0 is used
#                           to terminate the data.
#

.section    .data

data_items:
    .long 3, 67, 34, 14, 45, 75, 54, 187, 44, 87, 22, 11, 66, 0

.section    .text

.globl    _start
_start:

movl    $0, %edi                         # Move 0 into the index register
movl    data_items (, %edi, 4), %eax    # Load the first byte of data
movl    %eax, %ebx                      # The biggest

start_loop:

cmpl    $0, %eax                         # Check to see if we've hit the end
je      loop_exit
incl    %edi                            # Load next value
movl    data_items (, %edi, 4), %eax
cmpl    %ebx, %eax                      # Compare values
jle     start_loop                      # Jump to the beginning if new value
                                        # Isn't larger
movl    %eax, %ebx                      # Move the value as the largest
jmp     start_loop                      # Jump to the beginning of loop

loop_exit:

# %ebx is the status code for the exit system call
# and it contains the maximum number
movl    $1, %eax                         # 1 is the exit() system call
int     $0x80

I know that I could just hard code the length of the list of data, or I could store it in the first byte of data, but the exercise is asking to terminate the loop by using the address of the last element. The book mentions using a symbol to mark the end. I think my problem is that I just don't understand how to get the address. If I knew how to get it I could just store it in a register. Any help is appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

With some minor mods for Mac OSX...

.data

data_items:
    .long 3, 67, 34, 14, 45, 75, 54, 187, 44, 87, 22, 11, 66, 0
data_end:

.text

.globl    start
start:
        movl    $0, %edi                       # Move 0 into the index register
        movl    data_items (, %edi, 4), %eax   # Load the first data value
        movl    %eax, %ebx                     # The biggest
        leal    data_end, %ecx                 # Load and save ending address

start_loop:
        leal    data_items(, %edi, 4), %eax    # Get address of next value
        cmpl    %eax, %ecx                     # Check to see if we've hit the end
        je      loop_exit
        incl    %edi                           # Increment index
        movl    (%eax), %eax                   # Load value
        cmpl    %ebx, %eax                     # Compare values
        jle     start_loop                     # Jump to the beginning if new value
                                               # Isn't larger
        movl    %eax, %ebx                     # Move the value as the largest
        jmp     start_loop                     # Jump to the beginning of loop

loop_exit:
        movl    $1, %eax                       # 1 is the exit() system call
        pushl   %ebx
        pushl   $0

        int     $0x80
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Ask yourself this: Do I know the starting address of the data? How do I know it? Do I know the size of the data? How do I know this? Can I learn the ending address from this information?

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It's that last question that I'm having trouble with. –  Cole Rowland Oct 13 '12 at 18:10
    
If you know the starting address, the number of items in the data and the size of each element you soul be able to calculate the ending address. You can make it even easier if you know how to declare labels, perhaps you can declare one near the last element? –  Jens Björnhager Oct 13 '12 at 21:56

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