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So I want to write a... well... not-so-simple parser with boost::spirit::qi. I know the bare basics of boost spirit, having gotten acquainted with it for the first time in the past couple of hours.

Basically I need to parse this:

# comment

# other comment

set "Myset A"
{
    figure "AF 1"
    {
        i 0 0 0
        i 1 2 5
        i 1 1 1
        f 3.1 45.11 5.3
        i 3 1 5
        f 1.1 2.33 5.166
    }

    figure "AF 2"
    {
        i 25 5 1
        i 3 1 3
    }
}

# comment

set "Myset B"
{
    figure "BF 1"
    {
        f 23.1 4.3 5.11
    }
}

set "Myset C"
{
    include "Myset A" # includes all figures from Myset A

    figure "CF"
    {
        i 1 1 1
        f 3.11 5.33 3
    }
}

Into this:

struct int_point { int x, y, z; };
struct float_point { float x, y, z; };

struct figure
{
    string name;
    vector<int_point> int_points;
    vector<float_point> float_points;
};

struct figure_set
{
    string name;
    vector<figure> figures
};

vector<figure_set> figure_sets; // fill with the data of the input

Now, obviously having somebody write it for me would be too much, but can you please provide some tips on what to read and how to structure the grammar and parsers for this task?

And also... it may be the case that boost::spirit is not the best library I could use for the task. If so, which one is?

EDIT: Here's where I've gotten so far. But I'm not yet sure how to go on: http://liveworkspace.org/code/212c31dfc0b6fbdf6c462d8d931c0e9f

I am able to read a single figure but, I don't yet have an idea how to parse a set of figures.

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  Austin Oct 13 '12 at 17:06
    
Nothing yet... I'm still reading and experimenting with much, MUCH simpler grammars. –  Borislav Stanimirov Oct 13 '12 at 17:08
    
Added where I've gotten so far in an edit. –  Borislav Stanimirov Oct 13 '12 at 21:38
    
Oh great. I just wrote this, and then noticed you had linked to liveworkspace... Ok, just posting as an answer anyway –  sehe Oct 13 '12 at 23:33
    
Well my link is very much incomplete. Thanks for the answer :) –  Borislav Stanimirov Oct 13 '12 at 23:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here's my take on it

I believe the rule that will have been the blocker for you would be

figure  = eps >> "figure" 
    >> name         [ at_c<0>(_val) = _1 ] >> '{' >> 
    *(
            ipoints [ push_back(at_c<1>(_val), _1) ]
          | fpoints [ push_back(at_c<2>(_val), _1) ]
     ) >> '}';

This is actually a symptom of the fact that you parse inter-mixed i and f lines into separate containers.

See below for an alternative.

Here's my full code: test.cpp

//#define BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG // before including Spirit
#define BOOST_SPIRIT_USE_PHOENIX_V3
#include <boost/fusion/adapted.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/karma.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix_fusion.hpp>
#include <fstream>

namespace Format
{
    struct int_point   { int x, y, z;   }; 
    struct float_point { float x, y, z; }; 

    struct figure
    {
        std::string              name;
        std::vector<int_point>   int_points;
        std::vector<float_point> float_points;

        friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, figure const& o);
    };

    struct figure_set
    {
        std::string           name;
        std::set<std::string> includes;
        std::vector<figure>   figures;

        friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, figure_set const& o);
    };

    typedef std::vector<figure_set> file_data;
}

BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(Format::int_point,   
        (int, x)(int, y)(int, z))
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(Format::float_point, 
        (float, x)(float, y)(float, z))
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(Format::figure,      
        (std::string, name)
        (std::vector<Format::int_point>, int_points)
        (std::vector<Format::float_point>, float_points))
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(Format::figure_set,  
        (std::string, name)
        (std::set<std::string>, includes)
        (std::vector<Format::figure>, figures))

namespace Format
{
    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, figure const& o)
    {
        using namespace boost::spirit::karma;
        return os << format_delimited(
                "\n    figure" << no_delimit [ '"' << string << '"' ] << "\n    {"
                << *("\n       i" << int_ << int_ << int_)
                << *("\n       f" << float_ << float_ << float_)
                << "\n    }"
                , ' ', o);
    }

    std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, figure_set const& o)
    {
        using namespace boost::spirit::karma;
        return os << format_delimited(
                "\nset" << no_delimit [ '"' << string << '"' ] << "\n{"
                << *("\n    include " << no_delimit [ '"' << string << '"' ])
                << *stream
                << "\n}"
                , ' ', o);
    }
}

namespace /*anon*/
{
    namespace phx=boost::phoenix;
    namespace qi =boost::spirit::qi;

    template <typename Iterator> struct skipper
        : public qi::grammar<Iterator>
    {
        skipper() : skipper::base_type(start, "skipper")
        {
            using namespace qi;

            comment = '#' >> *(char_ - eol) >> (eol|eoi);
            start   = comment | qi::space;

            BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(start);
            BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(comment);
        }

      private:
        qi::rule<Iterator> start, comment;
    };

    template <typename Iterator> struct parser
        : public qi::grammar<Iterator, Format::file_data(), skipper<Iterator> >
    {
        parser() : parser::base_type(start, "parser")
        {
            using namespace qi;
            using phx::push_back;
            using phx::at_c;

            name    = eps >> lexeme [ '"' >> *~char_('"') >> '"' ];

            include = eps >> "include" >> name;
            ipoints = eps >> "i"       >> int_         >> int_   >> int_;
            fpoints = eps >> "f"       >> float_       >> float_ >> float_;

            figure  = eps >> "figure" 
                >> name         [ at_c<0>(_val) = _1 ] >> '{' >> 
                *(
                        ipoints [ push_back(at_c<1>(_val), _1) ]
                      | fpoints [ push_back(at_c<2>(_val), _1) ]
                 ) >> '}';
            set     = eps >> "set" >> name >> '{' >> *include >> *figure >> '}';
            start   = *set;
        }

      private:
        qi::rule<Iterator, std::string()        , skipper<Iterator> > name, include;
        qi::rule<Iterator, Format::int_point()  , skipper<Iterator> > ipoints;
        qi::rule<Iterator, Format::float_point(), skipper<Iterator> > fpoints;
        qi::rule<Iterator, Format::figure()     , skipper<Iterator> > figure;
        qi::rule<Iterator, Format::figure_set() , skipper<Iterator> > set;
        qi::rule<Iterator, Format::file_data()  , skipper<Iterator> > start;
    };
}

namespace Parser {

    bool parsefile(const std::string& spec, Format::file_data& data)
    {
        std::ifstream in(spec.c_str());
        in.unsetf(std::ios::skipws);

        std::string v;
        v.reserve(4096);
        v.insert(v.end(), std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(in.rdbuf()), std::istreambuf_iterator<char>());

        if (!in) 
            return false;

        typedef char const * iterator_type;
        iterator_type first = &v[0];
        iterator_type last = first+v.size();

        try
        {
            parser<iterator_type>  p;
            skipper<iterator_type> s;
            bool r = qi::phrase_parse(first, last, p, s, data);

            r = r && (first == last);

            if (!r)
                std::cerr << spec << ": parsing failed at: \"" << std::string(first, last) << "\"\n";
            return r;
        }
        catch (const qi::expectation_failure<char const *>& e)
        {
            std::cerr << "FIXME: expected " << e.what_ << ", got '" << std::string(e.first, e.last) << "'" << std::endl;
            return false;
        }
    }
}

int main()
{
    Format::file_data data;
    bool ok = Parser::parsefile("input.txt", data);

    std::cerr << "Parse " << (ok?"success":"failed") << std::endl;
    std::cout << "# figure sets exported automatically by karma\n\n";

    for (auto& set : data)
        std::cout << set;
}

It outputs the parsed data as a verification: output.txt

Parse success
# figure sets exported automatically by karma


set "Myset A"
{ 
    figure "AF 1"
    { 
       i 0 0 0 
       i 1 2 5 
       i 1 1 1 
       i 3 1 5 
       f 3.1 45.11 5.3 
       f 1.1 2.33 5.166 
    }  
    figure "AF 2"
    { 
       i 25 5 1 
       i 3 1 3 
    }  
} 
set "Myset B"
{ 
    figure "BF 1"
    { 
       f 23.1 4.3 5.11 
    }  
} 
set "Myset C"
{ 
    include  "Myset A"
    figure "CF"
    { 
       i 1 1 1 
       f 3.11 5.33 3.0 
    }  
}

You will note that

  • the order of the point lines are changed (all int_points precede all float_points)
  • also, non-significant digits are added, e.g. in the last line 3.0 instead of 3 to show that the type if float.
  • you had 'forgotten' (?) about the includes in your question

Alternative

Have something that keeps the actual point lines in original order:

typedef boost::variant<int_point, float_point> if_point;

struct figure
{
    std::string            name;
    std::vector<if_point>  if_points;
}

Now the rules become simply:

name    = eps >> lexeme [ '"' >> *~char_('"') >> '"' ];

include = eps >> "include" >> name;
ipoints = eps >> "i"       >> int_         >> int_   >> int_;
fpoints = eps >> "f"       >> float_       >> float_ >> float_;

figure  = eps >> "figure" >> name >> '{' >> *(ipoints | fpoints) >> '}';
set     = eps >> "set"    >> name >> '{' >> *include >> *figure  >> '}';
start   = *set;

Note the elegance in

figure  = eps >> "figure" >> name >> '{' >> *(ipoints | fpoints) >> '}';

And the output stays in the exact order of the input: output.txt

Once again, full demo code (on github only): test.cpp

Bonus update

Finally, I made my first proper Karma grammar to output the results:

name    = no_delimit ['"' << string << '"'];
include = "include" << name;
ipoints = "\n        i" << int_   << int_   << int_;
fpoints = "\n        f" << float_ << float_ << float_;

figure  = "figure" << name << "\n    {" << *(ipoints | fpoints) << "\n    }";
set     = "set"    << name << "\n{" 
            << *("\n   " << include)
            << *("\n   " << figure)  << "\n}";

start   = "# figure sets exported automatically by karma\n\n" 
            << set % eol;

That was actually considerably more comfortable than I had expected. See it in the lastest version of the fully updated gist: test.hpp

share|improve this answer
    
Well let me just say, this was great. I learned more from your post, than from reading docs and manuals for the past 10 hours or so :) –  Borislav Stanimirov Oct 14 '12 at 0:03
    
@BorislavStanimirov Do read the update, too :) I think you will want this. (I'll see whether I can use a proper karma grammar instead of the halfbaked output stream operators I have now) –  sehe Oct 14 '12 at 0:11
    
Thank you again :) –  Borislav Stanimirov Oct 14 '12 at 0:15
    
@BorislavStanimirov I have added the karma grammar to get rid of the ugly ostream operators (including the boost::static_visitor, which is no longer needed now). Good night –  sehe Oct 14 '12 at 1:04

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