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I have to do sum of some columns basis on where clause for better understanding i am implementing a temporary table here

declare @tbl table(a int ,b int,c int)
insert into @tbl values(1,2,3)
insert into @tbl values(2,2,3)
insert into @tbl values(1,3,1)
insert into @tbl values(1,2,3)
insert into @tbl values(1,2,3)

and for finding sum of a,b,c ob basis of value of a,b,c ; i am using following query

 SELECT (
         SELECT SUM(a) from @tbl where a=1         
         )AS a ,          
          (SELECT SUM(b) from @tbl where b=2

         )AS b ,         
          (SELECT SUM(c) from @tbl where c=3

         )AS c

I ask one of my friend to make a single line query for this work and he suggest me following lines

select sum((case  when a=1 then a  else null end)),
        sum((case  when b=2 then b  else null end)),
        sum((case  when c=3 then c  else null end))
         from @tbl

Now i am thinking about performance which will work faster if i have 27 columns and millions of records ?

or any other method to achive this which will improve performance much better than these two

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1  
... and to shorten it a bit, you don't need the else part... ' Select Sum(Case a When 1 then 1 End) a, Sum(Case b When 2 then 2 End) b, Sum(Case c When 3 then 3 End) c From @tbl' will also work –  Charles Bretana Oct 13 '12 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Expanding on Martin's answer - it depends on what indexes you have and how populated the column is (nullable or not). Consider this example.

create table tbl (id int identity primary key, a int ,b int,c int, d int)
insert tbl values(1,2,3,null)
insert tbl values(2,null,3,1)
insert tbl values(1,null,1,4)
insert tbl values(1,null,3,5)
insert tbl values(1,null,3,6)
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --10
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --20
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --40
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --80
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --160
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --320
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --640
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --1280
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --2560
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --5120
insert tbl select a,b,c,d from tbl --10240

Column b is created nullable and is only 20% non-null. Now, run your queries against the table (with no indexes). Before you run it, make sure to press Ctrl-M (show actual execution plan). Run both queries in the same batch, i.e. highlight the text of both queries and execute.

SELECT (SELECT SUM(a) from tbl where a=1) AS a ,          
       (SELECT SUM(b) from tbl where b=2) AS b ,         
       (SELECT SUM(c) from tbl where c=3) AS c

select sum((case  when a=1 then a  else null end)),
       sum((case  when b=2 then b  else null end)),
       sum((case  when c=3 then c  else null end))
from tbl

I won't bore you with images here but look at the plan which will show a cost of about 75% against the top query and 25% against the bottom. That's expected, 75%:25% = 3:1 which is due to the first query passing through the table 3 times exactly. Now create these three indexes:

create index ix_tbl_a on tbl(a)
create index ix_tbl_b on tbl(b)
create index ix_tbl_c on tbl(c)

Then, rerun the query batch (both together). This time, you'll see a cost of about 51% to 49%. Quite close. The reason is because the (b) column being sparsely populated is very easy to SUM from the index pages alone. Even the other 2 columns are helped by retrieving more rows per index page than the clustered index on the data pages (which will contain all columns).

When you expand this to 27 columns, the first form could run faster if each column is sparsely populated and if you have an index on each of the 27 columns. A big ask, and even then, it will probably only be very marginally faster.

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any other method to achive this which will improve performance much better than these two –  rahularyansharma Oct 14 '12 at 4:13
    
one more thing indeing on all 27 columns not possible as there are very much insert and updates on that table –  rahularyansharma Oct 14 '12 at 4:24

It depends what indexes you have.

If a, b, and c all are indexed then the original version could be significantly faster. Particularly if a large proportion of the table doesn't meet any of the criteria.

If you have no useful indexes at all then the choice is three scans vs one scan so the CASE version should be faster.

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The second option makes a single pass of the table; the first one makes multiple passes. Performance-wise, the second option should be superior in most cases.

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and if i have millions of records then second one will check each record .. is it not more costly then the first one ? –  rahularyansharma Oct 13 '12 at 17:58
    
if you are dealing with millions of records, you are much better of with the second option. With the first option, you will be making 27 passes of the table and given that it is highly likely that only a few of those 27 columns will be indexed, many of these passes will degrade to table scans. –  1_CR Oct 13 '12 at 18:03
    
good to see your reply,may be you are correct but , i am waiting for more detail answer as i got in my previous question when i ask about performance some sql guru come with detail answer with query execution plan .. –  rahularyansharma Oct 13 '12 at 18:05
3  
Trying to explain: Imagine you have a deck of standard playing cards (four suits and 13 cards in each suit) and you are asked "how many face cards are in each suit?". You could go through the entire deck of cards four times (one for each suit) and count the face cards. Or, you could go through the deck one time and count the face cards for each suit as they appear. The first would be your "sub-query" solution; the second is your "single pass" solution. It should be obvious that reading through your table only one time (collecting results) will be more efficient than reading 27 times. –  BellevueBob Oct 13 '12 at 19:02

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