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I am having a problem which makes me think that I don't understand something fundamental. I am using MySQL++ and when calling query.execute() (where "query" is an instance of class mysqlpp::Query) it works, but when calling query->execute() (where "query" is a pointer to an instance of class myqslpp::Query) the same query fails! The error message is "Query was empty".

Here is the code I used for testing this.

The following runs without errors, and the table is created in the database.

void test1() {
    mysqlpp::Connection conn;
    conn.connect(0, "server", "user", "password");
    conn.select_db("db_name");

    mysqlpp::Query query = conn.query();
    try {
        query << "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS MY_TABLE (MY_COLUMN SMALLINT)";
        query.execute();
    }
    catch (const mysqlpp::BadQuery&) {
        std::cerr << query.error() << std::endl;
    }
}

While the following produces output "Query was empty" and the table is not created in the database.

void test2() {
    mysqlpp::Connection conn;
    mysqlpp::Query *query = 0;
    conn.connect(0, "server", "user", "password");
    conn.select_db("db_name");

    query = &conn.query();
    try {
        *query << "CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS MY_TABLE (MY_COLUMN SMALLINT)";
        query->execute();
    }
    catch (const mysqlpp::BadQuery&) {
        std::cerr << query->error() << std::endl;
    }
    query = 0;
}
share|improve this question

It looks like in the latter version, you're storing the address to a temporary object (the return value of a function, temporarily stored on the stack) that is destructed right away.

That means that your query isn't necessarily a valid, active object once you get to your execute call.

Unsure what compiler you're using, but g++ normally gives a warning: taking address of temporary warning for code like this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Changing the line "query = &conn.query()" into "query = new mysqlpp::Query(&conn, true)" made it work. But I can't say I understand why, seeing how that is basically the same as what the conn->query() function does... I use the compiler that comes with Visual Studio 10, it did not give me any warnings. – user1236689 Oct 13 '12 at 20:02
    
@user1236689: No, the two aren't "basically the same". Your second block is trying to take the address of a temporary object returned by value from Connection::query(), and that object disappears between that line and the next. If this ever works, it's purely because the stack space hasn't been reused yet, and the OS+CPU combo doesn't check for accesses to freed stack space. Your successful alternative in your comment is creating the new object on the heap, not at all the same thing. The first block above works because you copy the temporary value into a named local variable before using it. – Warren Young Oct 15 '12 at 18:32

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