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My bash script is supposed to check if the user inputs two numbers. Each number should be preceded by either a + or a - sign. The first number should be four digits long, and the second number should be five digits long.

No matter what values I enter, the output is always Fail

Command-line statement to run the script:

$me add +1234 -12345

The script:

#!/bin/bash
#Script name add
if [ $1 != [\+\-][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] ] || 
   [ $2 != [\+\-][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] ]
  then
    echo Fail
else    
    echo Success
fi
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3 Answers 3

You need to use double brackets to enable advanced functionality that is more similar to traditional programming languages. For instance, to use || instead of -o and && instead of -a. Double brackets are also required in order to perform pattern (matching.

Also, brackets should be used for the entire expression, not for each sub-expression separately and should include the ||.

I would use a line like:

if [[ $1 == [+-][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] && 
      $2 == [+-][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9] ]]
  then
    echo "success"
else
    echo "fail"
fi

EDIT: using == instead of != (why be so negative?) and to remove references to regex (uses pattern matching).

share|improve this answer
    
-1 != is inequality, not negative pattern match. –  tripleee Oct 13 '12 at 19:55
    
@tripleee not true, see the edit to my answer to see how you're wrong. Did you test it out before making silly statements? –  DavidDraughn Oct 13 '12 at 20:17
    
@DavidDraughn That means shell glob patterns, not regular expressions. Citing the ABS as factual information should never be done. It's wrong about many things. See the PATTERN MATCHING section of your bash manpage. Your example can be made to work properly with extglob enabled. –  jordanm Oct 14 '12 at 17:07
    
Learn something every day. My apologies, @tripleee –  DavidDraughn Oct 15 '12 at 2:28
    
What's the problem here? You were right the first time, @DavidDraughn. The only mistake was in using the term "regex", though "pattern match" is also used (the code is valid as both regex and shell pattern). "Globbing" technically means only "filename expansion", but they are often used interchangeably. I prefer what you have now, but also [[ $1 != pat || $2 != pattern ]] and [[ ! $1 == pat || ! $2 == pat ]] are exactly equivalent. Both == and != match shell patterns. Neither match regex. Beginning in Bash 4.1 alpha, extglob patterns are forced on within [[ for == and !=. –  ormaaj Oct 15 '12 at 4:35

POSIX-style tests ([) don't perform pattern matching at all. The != operator is a string comparison. ksh-style tests ([[)) perform pattern matching with reglular shell patterns using the == operator, and ERE matching with =~. (There is no !=~, but we can DeMorganify)

! [[ $1 =~ [-+][[:digit:]]{4} && $2 =~ [-+][[:digit:]]{5} ]]

To perform pattern matching in POSIX sh, the only option is the case statement.

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I don't think there is a way (I was wrong, there is a way) to do pattern matching using if statement. case can be used for such things. Working example:

#!/bin/bash

#Script name add

case $1 in
    [+-][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]) r1='success' ;;
    *) r1='fail' ;;
esac
case $2 in
    [+-][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]) r2='success' ;;
    *) r2='fail' ;;
esac

if [ $r1 = 'fail' ] || [ $r2 = 'fail' ]
then
    echo Fail
else
    echo Success
fi
share|improve this answer
    
You absolutely can use pattern matching with if, see my answer. –  DavidDraughn Oct 13 '12 at 19:48
    
@DavidDraughn thanks for the correction. –  xaizek Oct 13 '12 at 20:21
    
&& will execute the next command as long as the previous one does NOT fail. || will execute the next command if the previous one DOES fail. Which does work. Just not the way that I would construct it, but doesn't make it incorrect. My bad :) I deleted my previous (incorrect) comment. –  DavidDraughn Oct 13 '12 at 20:31

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