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In the below example I would expect all the elements to be tuples, why is a tuple converted to a string when it only contains a single string?

>>> a = [('a'), ('b'), ('c', 'd')]
>>> a
['a', 'b', ('c', 'd')]
>>> 
>>> for elem in a:
...     print type(elem)
... 
<type 'str'>
<type 'str'>
<type 'tuple'>
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('a') just evaluates to 'a' –  oldrinb Oct 13 '12 at 19:24
    
Wow - 3 correct answers in 3 minutes :) However, note the secret of ,: a = 1, 2, 3; print a –  user166390 Oct 13 '12 at 19:26
1  
Brackets don't make a tuple, commas do. –  cdarke Oct 13 '12 at 20:28
    
@cdarke, except for the empty tuple (), which only consists in a pair of parentheses. –  Frédéric Hamidi Oct 14 '12 at 10:20
    
True, or rather, False - just about all an empty tuple is good for (if you see what I mean). –  cdarke Oct 14 '12 at 13:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Because those first two elements aren't tuples; they're just strings. The parenthesis don't automatically make them tuples. You have to add a comma after the string to indicate to python that it should be a tuple.

>>> a = [('a',), ('b',), ('c', 'd')]

From the Python Docs:

A special problem is the construction of tuples containing 0 or 1 items: the syntax has some extra quirks to accommodate these. Empty tuples are constructed by an empty pair of parentheses; a tuple with one item is constructed by following a value with a comma (it is not sufficient to enclose a single value in parentheses). Ugly, but effective.

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Your first two examples are not tuples, they are strings. Single-item tuples require a trailing comma, as in:

>>> a = [('a',), ('b',), ('c', 'd')]
>>> a
[('a',), ('b',), ('c', 'd')]
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('a') is not a tuple, but just a string.

You need to add an extra comma at the end to make python take them as tuple: -

>>> a = [('a',), ('b',), ('c', 'd')]
>>> a
[('a',), ('b',), ('c', 'd')]
>>> 
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