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I've got an 8-byte fixed-point number using longs, with a constant denominator of (1 << 24). How do I do division of two Fixed8 values? Since I'm using C#, I can't simply cast to a larger integer. Or am I thinking too much in the language?

Thanks.

public struct Fixed8
{
    private long _numerator;
    public const long DENOMINATOR = 1 << 24;
}
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1  
Do you mean you want to calculate a / b where a and b are two Fixed8 values? –  dtb Oct 13 '12 at 19:33
    
Sorry, thought that was clear. Yes. –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 19:43
    
I've got a faint thought in the back of my head that the calculation would be easier if I used M32.N32. Although that would probably require four separate calculations. –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 19:47

4 Answers 4

Here's an approach that keeps all the calculations in longs. It might not be quicker, though; I haven't measured.

public struct Fixed8
{
    public Fixed8(double value)
    {
        _numerator = (long)(value * DENOMINATOR);
    }

    private long _numerator;
    public const long DENOMINATOR = 1 << 24;

    public static Fixed8 operator /(Fixed8 a, Fixed8 b)
    {
        long remainder;
        long quotient = Math.DivRem(a._numerator, b._numerator, out remainder) * DENOMINATOR;

        long morePrecision = remainder * DENOMINATOR / b._numerator;

        return new Fixed8 { _numerator = quotient + morePrecision };
    }
}
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Using a System.Numerics.BigInteger is fine. But in this specific case, a System.Decimal actually has enough precision. So here's my suggestion:

 public static Fixed8 operator /(Fixed8 a, Fixed8 b)
 {
   decimal resultNumerator = (decimal)a._numerator * DENOMINATOR / b._numerator;
   return new Fixed8 { _numerator = Convert.ToInt64(resultNumerator) };
 }
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Currently using this; probably not the most efficient, though. –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 20:58
    
@NarftheMouse What makes you think it's not the "most efficient"? What efficiency do you need? Is your application spending all its ressources dividing Fixed8? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Oct 13 '12 at 21:14
    
Sorry; should have clarified. It's a practice exercise I assigned myself. Making it faster is part of the practice exercise. Since I've never managed to take a formal class (outside of some internet tutorial sites), things like that are important. –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 21:21

You could use the BigInteger Structure to perform the calculations:

public static Fixed8 operator /(Fixed8 a, Fixed8 b)
{
    Fixed8 result;
    result._numerator = (long)( new BigInteger(a._numerator) *
                                new BigInteger(DENOMINATOR)  /
                                new BigInteger(b._numerator) );
    return result;
}

Full code:

public const long DENOMINATOR = 1 << 24;

private long _numerator;

public Fixed8(double value)
{
    _numerator = (long)(value * DENOMINATOR);
}

public static Fixed8 operator /(Fixed8 a, Fixed8 b)
{
    Fixed8 result;
    result._numerator = (long)( new BigInteger(a._numerator) * 
                                new BigInteger(DENOMINATOR)  / 
                                new BigInteger(b._numerator) );
    return result;
}

public static explicit operator double(Fixed8 a)
{
    return (double)a._numerator / (double)DENOMINATOR;
}

public override string ToString()
{
    return ((double)this).ToString();
}

Example:

var a = new Fixed8(7);
var b = new Fixed8(1.7);

Console.WriteLine(a);
Console.WriteLine(b);
Console.WriteLine(a / b);

Output:

7
1.69999998807907
4.11764705181122
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While that's a possibility, BigInteger is slow by nature. I'm hoping for a fast division. –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 19:59
    
Unless there's some maths trick to perform the division in 64 bit, you're pretty much stuck with BigInteger or your own implementation of a larger data type. Maybe ask at math.stackexchange.com ? –  dtb Oct 13 '12 at 20:01
    
Might help; might get the question closed for being a programming question. –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 20:07
    
You'd have to rephrase the question a bit, of course, since your actual problem is not directly programming related. Essentially, you want to compute (((i * j) modulo 2^64) / k) modulo 2^64 and get the same result as (i * j) / k. It might help to split off the sign first. –  dtb Oct 13 '12 at 20:11
    
Wouldn't ( i * j ) / k also have to be ( ( i * j ) / k ) modulo 2^64? And saying "positive values only" would work? –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 20:18
public long Division()
{
    long result = _numerator / DENOMINATOR;
    return result;
}
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2  
Look up fixed-point numbers before you answer the question, if you don't know what they are. They're not fractions. –  Narf the Mouse Oct 13 '12 at 19:39

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