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This problem has occurred to me again in the past and I used global variables but I'd like to know what other way there is to deal with it.

The code is from an html5 canvas tutorial I'm playing with at the moment.

var x = 150;
var y = 150;
var dx = 2;
var dy = 4;
var ctx;

function init() {
  ctx = $('#canvas')[0].getContext("2d");
  return setInterval(draw, 10);
}

function draw() {
  ctx.clearRect(0,0,300,300);
  ctx.beginPath();
  ctx.arc(x, y, 10, 0, Math.PI*2, true); 
  ctx.closePath();
  ctx.fill();
  x += dx;
  y += dy;
}

init();

What can I do to avoid using global variables?

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4  
Wrap it all in a self-executing function declaration? (function() { /* your code */ })() –  DCoder Oct 13 '12 at 19:32
    
Declare them inside the function? I don't see why you shouldn't add these variables to the window object if they are used across multiple functions. –  George Reith Oct 13 '12 at 19:33
    
@DCoder As in chumkiu's answer? –  AnPel Oct 13 '12 at 19:40
1  
Yes, that was my original suggestion, but Gabriel Florit's and Elias Van Ootegem's answers are probably more appropriate. –  DCoder Oct 13 '12 at 19:52
    
@DCoder sorry. Your suggestion was before my answer (I'm very slow to write in english). I deleted it also because Gabriel's answer is more complete :-) –  chumkiu Oct 13 '12 at 19:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use the module pattern - it's a neat way of providing encapsulation:

var app = app || {};
app = (function () {
  var x = 150; // all these variables are private
  var y = 150;
  var dx = 2;
  var dy = 4;
  var ctx;

  var draw = function() { // this method is private
    ctx.clearRect(0,0,300,300);
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(x, y, 10, 0, Math.PI*2, true); 
    ctx.closePath();
    ctx.fill();
    x += dx;
    y += dy;
  };

  return {
    init: function() { // this method is public
      ctx = $('#canvas')[0].getContext("2d");
      return setInterval(draw, 10);
    }
  }
}());

app.init(); // init() is public, but all the other vars and functions are not

Read more about it at http://addyosmani.com/largescalejavascript/#modpattern.

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2  
+1 for incorporating the OP's code. –  nalply Oct 13 '12 at 19:42

You can use an object, as illustrated here

myObj = {
    x: 150,
    y: 150,
    dx: 2,
    dy: 4,
    ctx: null,
    init: function() {
        this.ctx = $('#canvas')[0].getContext("2d");
        return setInterval((function(a){return function(){a.draw()}})(this), 10);
    },
    draw: function() {
        this.ctx.clearRect(0,0,300,300);
        this.ctx.beginPath();
        this.ctx.arc(this.x, this.y, 10, 0, Math.PI * 2, true);
        this.ctx.closePath();
        this.ctx.fill();
        this.x += this.dx;
        this.y += this.dy;
    }
}

myObj.init();

IMPORTANT Full disclosure, this code is not working as is. While I stand by my general approach, the setInterval still needs to be passed the correct context. I have fixed my answer to reflect the above and added a working example to the fiddle link. If the context passing is confusing for you, please use the other approaches.

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thanks, don't really know why I made a fiddle in the first place. –  Asad Oct 13 '12 at 19:42

Pass them as parameters, and return them modified:

function init() {
  var x = 150;
  var y = 150;
  var dx = 2;
  var dy = 4;
  var ctx = $('#canvas')[0].getContext("2d");
  return setInterval(function() {
    var temp = draw(x, y, dx, dy, ctx);
    x = temp.x;
    y = temp.y;
  }, 10);
}

function draw(x, y, dx, dy, ctx) {
  ctx.clearRect(0,0,300,300);
  ctx.beginPath();
  ctx.arc(x, y, 10, 0, Math.PI*2, true); 
  ctx.closePath();
  ctx.fill();
  x += dx;
  y += dy;
  ret = {};
  ret.x = x;
  ret.y = y;
  return ret;
}

(I'm not entirely sure what needs to be passed; if you can do so, pass less so as to reduce coupling.)

This solution is, however, inferior to a more class-like method, such as one proposed by @Asad.

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It's tempting, and indeed easy just to wrap everything in an object, or an IIFE, which takes care of globals, but that doesn't really bring anything new to the party. I'd suggest a simple closure, where all the variables are set inside the init function. In this function we define the draw function, so that function has access to the closure vars. Since that function is only used to set an interval, I left out the name, because there simply is no need to have a named function in this closure.

var init = function()
{
    var x, y, dx, dy, ctx = document.getElementById('canvas').getContext('2d');
    return setInterval(function()
    {
        ctx.clearRect(0,0,300,300);
        ctx.beginPath();
        ctx.arc(x, y, 10, 0, Math.PI*2, true); 
        ctx.closePath();
        ctx.fill();
        x += dx;
        y += dy;
    },10);
};
var iv = init();//<-- best off storing the interval somewhere
//... stop drawing:
clearInterval(iv);

That's all there is too it.

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