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I'm supposed to be getting comfortable with fork, and I saw an exercise that said to use a fork call to search an array indexed from 0 to 15. We're to assume that each process can only do two things...(1) is to check to see if an array is length 1, and (2) compare a single element of an array to the number were searching for. Basically i pass it a number, and its supposed to do a finite number of forks and return the index of that number. Here's my code..

#define MAXINDEX 16

int forkSearch(int a[], int search, int start, int end){
  if(start == end){
    if(*(a + end) == search){
      return end;
    }
  } 
  else{
    pid_t child = fork();
    if(child == 0) return forkSearch(a, search, start, end/2);
    else return forkSearch(a, search, (start + end)/2, end);
  }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]){
  int searchArray[MAXINDEX] = {1, 12, 11, 5, 10, 6, 4, 9, 13, 2, 8, 14, 3,\
                               15, 7};
  printf("Should be 1. Index of 12 = %d\n", forkSearch(searchArray,
                                                       12, 0, MAXINDEX));
  return 0;
} 

Everything in the return of this quickly exploding program seems to be either 1, 10, 11, or 13. Why isn't this working like it should.

share|improve this question
    
not your solution, but did you intend to init that array of 16 int's with 15 values ? –  WhozCraig Oct 13 '12 at 19:51
4  
"I'm supposed to be getting comfortable with fork" - Try the Spoon and be careful with the knife :-) –  Ed Heal Oct 13 '12 at 19:51
2  
Shouldn't your child process be searching (a, search, start, (start + end) / 2) rather than (a, search, start, end/2)? The two are only equivalent when start == 0, which won't always be the case... –  cHao Oct 13 '12 at 19:51
2  
@EdHeal lol. ok that was good. –  WhozCraig Oct 13 '12 at 19:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
if(child == 0) return forkSearch(a, search, start, end/2);

That's the wrong end there, it should be (start+end)/2, and the start index of the search in the right half should be (start+end)/2 + 1. Otherwise, if the right half is (start+end)/2 .. end, when end == start+1, the start for the recursive call is the old start value and you have an infinite loop.

Your programme has undefined behaviour because

int forkSearch(int a[], int search, int start, int end){
  if(start == end){
    if(*(a + end) == search){
      return end;
    }
  }

doesn't return a value if start == end, but *(a+end) != search. Add an exit(0); after the inner if to exit the processes that didn't find the target.

int searchArray[MAXINDEX] = {...};

forkSearch(searchArray, 12, 0, MAXINDEX)

will lead to an out-of-bounds access at searchArray[MAXINDEX], also undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Fish.. let me introduce you to your barrel for the evening. –  WhozCraig Oct 13 '12 at 19:54
    
Okay, something about shooting fish in a barrel, but I don't get the joke, unfortunately. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 13 '12 at 19:56
    
Now it just runs infinitely in a loop..? FIXED. Found it. Did the -1 in the wrong spot.. –  SetSlapShot Oct 13 '12 at 19:59
    
@SetSlapShot Needs a minor change still, see update. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 13 '12 at 20:22

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