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SELECT * FROM test;
 a | b 
---+---
 1 | 5
 4 | 1
 2 | 5
 3 | 3
 1 | 1
(5 rows)

How can i write such query, so all output values in "a" column are distinct and all output values in "b" column are also distinct.

So, for example, valid result set for above query is:

 1 | 5
 4 | 1
 3 | 3

Next one is also valid:

 4 | 1
 2 | 5
 3 | 3

It is better to find as many results as possible, but it's not a requirement.
What is the best way to do that ?

Thanks.

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closed as not a real question by Erwin Brandstetter, MatBailie, Leigh, Kjuly, HackedByChinese Oct 18 '12 at 6:13

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What if there were not equal? I mean you had 3 distinct values on A and 5 distinct values on be. Then what's gonna be as the result? –  Rikki Rockett Oct 13 '12 at 20:03
    
why 1|5 and not 2|5? –  Ankur Oct 13 '12 at 20:05
1  
So could you please show us how the exact result set would be? Without the correct input, there is no ouput. –  Rikki Rockett Oct 13 '12 at 20:15
1  
So 1|3 would also be valid in the result set? What happens if there are three distinct a values but 11 distinct b values? –  mu is too short Oct 13 '12 at 20:15
1  
That question description is nonsensical. If all distinct "a" values must appear, then 2 must appear in the "a" values list in the results, which it does not. You've posted an answer, but it answers a different question to this one. –  Craig Ringer Oct 14 '12 at 1:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Found solution myself! :)

a) add id column to "test" table
b) sql query:

 WITH 
    t1 AS ( SELECT a, MIN(id) as id FROM test GROUP BY a ), 
    t2 AS ( SELECT b, MIN(id) as id FROM test GROUP BY b ) 
    SELECT * FROM test 
    WHERE id IN ( SELECT id FROM t1 ) AND id IN ( SELECT id FROM t2 );

Result:

 id | a | b 
----+---+---
  6 | 1 | 5
  7 | 4 | 1
  9 | 3 | 3
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4  
You never mentioned you had an ID column in that table. –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 13 '12 at 20:23
2  
I think this solution is a little bit over simplified. If your data are 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2 then your code will only return one row; 1, 1. Would that really be correct? –  MatBailie Oct 13 '12 at 20:37
2  
@OlegGolovanov then you could have just picked the first row, that would have been fine –  Ankur Oct 13 '12 at 20:48
1  
This is a perfect answer to a different question. Which one is right? I guess we'll never know. –  wildplasser Oct 14 '12 at 0:26
1  
@OlegGolovanov If that's correct then your problem statement is wrong, because Dems' example would have to produce a result that included 2 in both the 1st and 2nd cols to be correct. –  Craig Ringer Oct 14 '12 at 1:08
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I think this should also give you correct output: SELECT a, MIN(b) as b FROM test GROUP BY a Intersect SELECT min(a) as a, b FROM test GROUP BY b;

EDIT:Try this:

Select MIN(t1.a), t1.b from (SELECT a, MIN(b) as b FROM test GROUP BY a) t1 GROUP BY t1.b
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work, result set (3, 3), (1, 1) –  xception Oct 13 '12 at 20:33
    
@xception changed the query –  Ankur Oct 13 '12 at 20:39
    
this one works, result set I got (1, 1), (2, 5), (3, 3) –  xception Oct 13 '12 at 20:41
    
@xception where are you trying? are there alternate sites to sqlfiddle? it seems to have gone out of memory –  Ankur Oct 13 '12 at 20:43
    
I also was thinking about using 2 group by clauses, didn't figure how to separate them though, you got my vote. –  xception Oct 13 '12 at 20:44
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