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I'm having trouble overloading the + operator, and I can't figure out what the cause is. The + operator returns a Polynomial (called C) but it returns it by value, where as the assignment operator is expecting a Polynomial object as a parameter passed by reference. To make C=A+B work, do I need to have a second assignment operator function that takes a Polynomial passed by value as an argument? Thanks!

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;
void line(int lines);

class Polynomial
{
    private:
        int degree;
        int* coeffs;
    public:
        //constructors
        Polynomial() {degree=0;coeffs=new int[1];}
        Polynomial(int deg) {degree=deg;coeffs=new int[deg+1];}
        Polynomial(const Polynomial& A);

        //mutators
        void GetCoeffs(istream& in);
        void EditCoeff(int deg);
        void ResetCoeffs();
        int Coeff(int deg);
        void Randomize(int max);

        //accessors
        void Show(ostream& out);
        int Degree() {return degree;}

        //operators
        friend Polynomial operator+(Polynomial& A, Polynomial& B);
        void operator =(Polynomial A);
};


int main()
{
    Polynomial A(5);
    Polynomial B(5);
    A.Randomize(5);
    B.Randomize(5);

    A.Show(cout);
    line(2);
    B.Show(cout);
    line(2);
    Polynomial C(5);
    C=A+B;
    C.Show(cout);

    return 0;
}

void Polynomial::Randomize(int max)
{
    for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
    {
        coeffs[i]=rand()%(max+1) + 1;
        if ((rand()%(101) + 1)%2 == 0)
            coeffs[i]*=-1;
    }
}

void Polynomial::operator =(Polynomial A)
{
    if (degree==A.degree)
    {
        for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
        {
            coeffs[i]=A.coeffs[i];
        }
    }
}

Polynomial Polynomial::operator+(Polynomial& A, Polynomial& B)
{
    Polynomial C;
    if (A.degree>=B.degree)
    {
        C=A;
        for (int i=B.degree; i>=0; i--)
        {
            C.coeffs[i]=A.coeffs[i]+B.coeffs[i];
        }
        C.Show(cout);
        return C;
    }
    else
    {
        C=B;
        for (int i=A.degree; i>=0; i--)
        {
            C.coeffs[i]=A.coeffs[i]+B.coeffs[i];
        }
        C.Show(cout);
        return C;

    }

}

int Polynomial::Coeff(int deg)
{
    return coeffs[deg];
}

void line(int lines)
{
    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
        cout << endl;
}

void Polynomial::GetCoeffs(istream& in)
{
    for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
    {
        in >> coeffs[i];
    }
    in.ignore();
}

void Polynomial::Show(ostream& out)
{
    for (int i=degree; i>=0; i--)
    {
        if (coeffs[i]>=0)
        {
            if (i!=degree)
                out << " + ";
            out << coeffs[i];


        }
        else
        {
            if (coeffs[i]<0)
                out << " - ";
                out << 0-coeffs[i];
        }
        if (i>1)
            out << "x^" << i;
        else if (i==1)
            out << "x";

    }
}

Polynomial::Polynomial(const Polynomial& A)
{
    coeffs=new int[A.degree+1];
    degree=A.degree;
    for (int i=A.degree; i>=0; i--)
    {
        coeffs[i]=A.coeffs[i];

    }

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This issue here is you have mixed up the global(Outside class definitions) operator+ and the member class definition of operator+.

(static) Polynomial operator+(Polynomial& A, Polynomial& B); This operator is used globally, so outside of a class.

Inside the class you need to use the following signature.

Polynomial& operator+(const Polynomial& other);

Here is an example.

Polynomial p;
Polynomial q;
p = p + q;

The code for this if the operator is define in the class is:

p = p.operator+(q); //only needs one parameter.

The code for this if the operator is define globally is:

p = ::operator+(p, q); //needs both parameter

NOTE: To use it as a non member function remove Polynomial operator+(Polynomial& A, Polynomial& B); from your definition Polynomial Polynomial::operator+(Polynomial& A, Polynomial& B){/**/} should be move above the main function and it now becomes:

static Polynomial operator+(Polynomial& A, Polynomial& B){/**/}

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry but I don't understand your answer. When I use typeid(A+B).name() it says that A+B is returning a variable of type Polynomial. That's great because my assignment operator works for assigning one Polynomial to another. If I do C=A, it works, so why doesn't C=A+B work? –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 13 '12 at 20:56
    
Just remove , Polynomial& B from the operator+ definition and your code will work. –  andre Oct 13 '12 at 21:03
    
But operator+ is not a member function, so doesn't it require both Polynomial objects to be passed to it? –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 13 '12 at 21:09
    
It actually is a member function. To prove it you can call do C=A.operator+(B); and it will work. So long as its defined in the class its a member function. If you need it to be global define it just above your main outside of the class. –  andre Oct 13 '12 at 21:13
    
So then how would I define a non-member function that is a friend function (so that it can directly access the member data) that does addition and returns a Polynomial object? Part of the point here is that I'm trying to make this a non-member function cause I read somewhere that it's good to do that whenever possible. –  BrownBeard93423 Oct 13 '12 at 21:16

Normally you would overload operator+ in one of two ways:

Polynomial operator+(const Polynomial &other) const;

or as a non-member function,

Polynomial operator+(Polynomial a, const Polynomial &b);

You don't normally need the friend qualifier for the latter since the implementation will likely be in terms of another overloaded operator already defined in the class:

Polynomial operator+=(const Polynomial &other);

Then your non-member implementation will just be:

Polynomial operator+(Polynomial a, const Polynomial &b)
{
     a+=b;
     return a;
}

If you insist on using the function as defined in your code, then you will need to make it a friend if you need access to private members:

Polynomial operator+(Polynomial &a, Polynomial &b)
{
     Polynomial p;
     // add them as needed
     return p;
}
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