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I'm building some stuff out using Attributes. One thing I'd really like to implement as an attribute is a convert a string to this property's type using this function. Right now, I have this:

    public delegate object ParameterConverter(string val);

    [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
    public class ParameterConverterAttribute : ParameterBaseAttribute
    {
        ParameterConverter Converter;
        public ParameterConverterAttribute(ParameterConverter converter)
        {
            Converter=converter;
        }
        public object Convert(string val)
        {
            return Converter(val);
        }
    }

And I use it like so:

public class Tester
{
    [ParameterConverter(new ParameterConverter(TestConverter)] //error here
    public int Foo{get;set;}
    static object TestConverter(string val)
    {
      return 10;
    }
}

However, .Net or at least C# doesn't appear to support this kind of thing. It appears that delegates inside of attributes doesn't work.

Is there any workarounds to this issue or a good way to deal with this problem?

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Are you looking for a general handler for deserializing a string to any arbitrary format given a particular parser? Or just setting an existing object's property? Or other input types besides just string? –  Chris Sinclair Oct 13 '12 at 20:54
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No Delegates cannot be passed as an argument to an Attribute. The Supported types are :

  1. Object
  2. Type
  3. Enum
  4. Single Dimentional Array
  5. bool, byte, float char, double, int, long, string .... etc.

But as it supports Type as well as strings, you can pass a Type and the name of the method to create a delegate inside the Attribute class.

public delegate object ParameterConverter(string val);

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public class ParameterConverterAttribute : ParameterBaseAttribute
{
    public ParameterConverter Converter { get; set; }
    public ParameterConverterAttribute(Type delegateType, string method)
    {
     try{ // Important as GetMethod can throw error exception or return null
        this.Converter = (ParameterConverter)Delegate.CreateDelegate(delegateType, delegateType.GetMethod(method));
      }
      catch { } 
    }
    public object Convert(string val)
    {
        if(this.Converter != null)
             return Converter(val);
    }
}

And now you can use it like :

public class Tester
{
    [ParameterConverter(typeof(ParameterConverter), "TestConverter"] 
    public int Foo{get;set;}
    static object TestConverter(string val)
    {
      return 10;
    }
}

I hope this would help you.

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1  
Well, this seems to be the answer rather I like it or not :( –  Earlz Oct 13 '12 at 22:13
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Lookup for TypeConverter class

or

Type Converter Example

This example shows how to create a type converter named AuthorConverter....The AuthorConverter example converts an Author object to a String and a String representation to an Author object.


UPDATE: You can skip the limitations of attributes like @abhishek has shown.

Possible another way is to define some "convention over configuration": converter function is a method defined like so private static Converter(string val) defined inside same class. In your case:

public class Tester
{
    public int Foo{get;set;}
    private static int FooConverter(string val)
    {
      return 10;
    }
}

You can put some ParameterConverterAttribute on top of the property as a sign that custom converter function exists, but is not mandatory.

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That won't work.. I use Convert.ToType by default, but I want to allow users to convert things in a custom way if they wish (particularly for thing that aren't a built-in type) –  Earlz Oct 13 '12 at 20:36
1  
Downvoters could you please comment ? –  Petar Repac Oct 13 '12 at 20:37
    
I suspect people are downvoting because it in no way solves the problem at hand (as I said) –  Earlz Oct 13 '12 at 20:42
    
undid my downvote for your edit. That could work but I hate "magical" things like that. I think I'd rather have a separate converter class with a custom interface like IParamConverter or something and use ParameterConverter(typeof(MyConverterClass))] –  Earlz Oct 13 '12 at 23:13
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