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Here is my code. I keep getting this error:

error: expected primary-expression before ')' token

Anyone have any ideas how to fix this?

void showInventory(player& obj) {   // By Johnny :D
for(int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
    std::cout << "\nINVENTORY:\n" + obj.getItem(i);
    i++;
    std::cout << "\t\t\t" + obj.getItem(i) + "\n";
    i++;
}
}

std::string toDo() //BY KEATON
{
std::string commands[5] =   // This is the valid list of commands.
    {"help", "inv"};

std::string ans;
std::cout << "\nWhat do you wish to do?\n>> ";
std::cin >> ans;

if(ans == commands[0]) {
    helpMenu();
    return NULL;
}
else if(ans == commands[1]) {
    showInventory(player);     // I get the error here.
    return NULL;
}

}
share|improve this question
    
Oh, ignore me, I can't read –  Collin Oct 13 '12 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

showInventory(player); is passing a type as parameter. That's illegal, you need to pass an object.

For example, something like:

player p;
showInventory(p);  

I'm guessing you have something like this:

int main()
{
   player player;
   toDo();
}

which is awful. First, don't name the object the same as your type. Second, in order for the object to be visible inside the function, you'll need to pass it as parameter:

int main()
{
   player p;
   toDo(p);
}

and

std::string toDo(player& p) 
{
    //....
    showInventory(p);
    //....
}
share|improve this answer
    
'player' is the object name though. I am trying to pass the object 'player'. –  Tux Oct 13 '12 at 20:48
1  
@user1743924 really? Where is it declared (certainly not in the code you posted)? In fact, the line showInventory(player& obj) tells us that player is a type, not an object. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 13 '12 at 20:49
1  
@user1743924 you named a variable the same as the type? Don't. Regardless, that variable is declared in main, not in toDo. You'll need to pass it as a parameter. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 13 '12 at 20:52
    
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { player player; –  Tux Oct 13 '12 at 20:53
    
@user1743924 see edit. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 13 '12 at 20:56
showInventory(player);     // I get the error here.

void showInventory(player& obj) {   // By Johnny :D

this means that player is an datatype and showInventory expect an referance to an variable of type player.

so the correct code will be

  void showInventory(player& obj) {   // By Johnny :D
    for(int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
        std::cout << "\nINVENTORY:\n" + obj.getItem(i);
        i++;
        std::cout << "\t\t\t" + obj.getItem(i) + "\n";
        i++;
    }
    }

players myPlayers[10];

    std::string toDo() //BY KEATON
    {
    std::string commands[5] =   // This is the valid list of commands.
        {"help", "inv"};

    std::string ans;
    std::cout << "\nWhat do you wish to do?\n>> ";
    std::cin >> ans;

    if(ans == commands[0]) {
        helpMenu();
        return NULL;
    }
    else if(ans == commands[1]) {
        showInventory(myPlayers[0]);     // or any other index,also is not necessary to have an array
        return NULL;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
The correct way is certainly not having globals. The correct way is passing the object as a parameter. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 13 '12 at 20:55
    
Totally agree with you, but when you have global function in C style, having global object is not so bad. –  Adrian Herea Oct 13 '12 at 20:59
    
Having anything C-style in C++ code is not bad, right... it's awful. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 13 '12 at 20:59
    
Why not globals? In a game, wouldn't you want to program the player as a global? –  Tux Oct 13 '12 at 21:03
    
Not really this is why in C++ we have class. You can have a PlayersManager with getter/setter or something like this to handle players. –  Adrian Herea Oct 13 '12 at 21:04

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