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It seems that values aren't safe to copy with memcpy unless the type is trivially copyable, i.e. satisfies the std::is_trivially_copyable type trait. I wonder what the purpose of the type traits std::is_trivially_copy_assignable, std::is_trivially_copy_constructible, std::is_trivially_move_assignable and std::is_trivially_move_constructible is if you can't exploit them for initialization or assignment with memcpy. Do they permit other optimizations?

I also wonder why the standard requires a trivial destructor for values to be copyable with memcpy. (A trivial destructor does simplify physically moving a value in memory, but it doesn't seem to be fundamentally necessary for just duplicating a value with memcpy).

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Imagine that the destructor does some work (anything). If you just copy (bitwise), then you know have two objects that will do this work when their destructor is run. Obviously, the type should have a non-trivial copy-constructor to begin with, but this check on the destructor can be seen as a last resort measure :) – Matthieu M. Oct 13 '12 at 20:59
    
If you actually want to duplicate a value, then you would expect the destructor to eventually run twice. Also, if you manually manage the allocation and freeing, e.g. in a container class, you could just omit the destructor call on the original value before freeing or reusing the memory. – Stephan Oct 13 '12 at 21:17

Sure. One could write a vector class template that exploits this and invokes std::memcpy in its copy constructor in case it's safe to do so. I believe at least one implementations of std::copy employs a similar optimization for the case when the iterators are of type T* and T is trivially copyable.

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Does the standard actually permit copying with memcpy if a class e.g. satisfies std::is_trivially_copy_constructible and std::is_trivially_copy_assignable but not std::is_trivially_copyable? Or what does your "Sure." refer to? – Stephan Oct 13 '12 at 21:26

I wonder what the purpose of the type traits std::is_trivially_copy_assignable, std::is_trivially_copy_constructible, std::is_trivially_move_assignable and std::is_trivially_move_constructible if you can't exploit them for initialization or assignment with memcpy

They tell you properties of the type, isn't that enough reason to exist?

You might have a type which has a trivial copy constructor but a non-trivial move constructor, so it would not qualify as a trivially copyable type, but is trivially-copy-constructible.

When using such a type you could use SFINAE or other static polymorphism to enable/disable certain operations unless they're guaranteed to be trivial. For example imagine a class template TrivialPair<A,B> which could declare its move constructor as deleted if A and B are not trivially move constructible, and similarly for the other operations. That would mean that TrivialPair only supports operations which A and B both support and which don't call any non-trivial functions.

I also wonder why the standard requires a trivial destructor for values to be copyable with memcpy

"Trivially copyable" can be thought of as saying the type is just a bunch of bytes, i.e. just data that can be copied to another place in memory safely and without altering the value. If the type has a non-trivial destructor then it's not just a bunch of bytes, it has some additional behaviour which the compiler doesn't comprehend, and which might make using memcpy unsafe.

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I'm just curious whether there is any use for knowing whether individual methods (copy constructor, assignment operator, etc.) are trivial. When a type is trivially copyable (i.e. satisfies "is_trivially_copy") or when it is guaranteed not to throw an exception, you can use that for optimizations, but why would you want to define a type like your TrivialPair type? – Stephan Oct 13 '12 at 21:42

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