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I have noticed me writing try-except clauses like the following very much in the past. The main reason for this is to write less code.

class Synchronizer(object):
    # ...

    def _assert_dir(self, dirname, argname, argnum):
        """ *Private*. Raises OSError if the passed string does not point
            to an existing directory on the file-system. """

        if not os.path.isdir(dirname):
            message = 'passed `%s` argument (%d) does not point to a ' \
                      'directory on the file-system.'
            raise OSError(message % (argname, argnum))

    def synchronize(self, source_dir, dest_dir, database):

        # Ensure the passed directories do exist.
        try:
            self._assert_dir(source_dir, 'source_dir', 2)
            self._assert_dir(dest_dir, 'dest_dir', 3)
        except OSError:
            raise

        # ...

I was doing it this way, because otherwise I would've needed to write

class Synchronizer(object):
    # ...

    def synchronize(self, source_dir, dest_dir, database):

        # Ensure the passed directories do exist.
        if not os.path.isdir(source_dir):
            message = 'passed `source_dir` argument (2) does not point to a ' \
                      'directory on the file-system.'
            raise OSError(message)

        if not os.path.isdir(dest_dir):
            message = 'passed `dest_dir` argument (3) does not point to a ' \
                      'directory on the file-system.'
            raise OSError(message)

        # ...

I actually like the idea of writing methods doing check-and-raise operations, but I see one big disadvantage: Readability. Especially for editors that do code-folding, the try statement is not very much telling the reader what happens inside of it, while if not os.path.isdir(source_dir) is quite a good hint.

IMHO the try-except clause is required because it would confuse the catcher of the exception (reader of the traceback) where the exception comes from.

What do you think about this design? Is it awful, great or confusing to you? Or do you have any ideas on how to improve the situation?

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2 Answers

This depends upon your requirement..

  • If you want to catch some exception, and continue with the code in your method, then you should use the 2nd scenario. Have yout try-except block inside your method.

    def function():
       try:
          raise IOError
       except IOError e:
          // Handle
       //continue with reset of the function
       print "This will get printed"
    
    function()
    
  • But if you want to handle all the exception at one place, with specific action for specific type, or you just want to halt your function, if one exception is raised, you can better handle them outside your function: -

    def function():
       raise IOError
    
       // subsequent code Will not execute
       print "This will not get printed"
    
    try:
       function()
    except IOError e:
       // Handle IOError
    except EOFError e1:
       // Handle EOF Error
    
  • By using the 2nd way, you are actually increasing the chance of some of your codes not getting executed. In general, your try-except block should be small. They should be separated for handling exception at different points and not all the exceptions should be handled at one place.

  • As far as I'm concerned, I generally like to minimize my try-except block as much as possible. That way I know where exactly my exception was raised.
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There are two questions that I ask myself before using try for handling exceptional conditions and if the answer is YES to both, only then I will try to handle the exception.

Q1. Is this truly an exception scenario? I do not want to execute try blocks if the condition occurs 90% of the time. It is better to use if - else in such a case.

Q2. Can I recover from the error? It makes little sense to handle the exception if I cannot recover from it. It's better to propagate it to a higher level which happens automatically without me having to write extra code.

The code posted by you does not do anything to recover if the directory does not exist and it does not appear that you can do much about it. Why not let the error propagate to a higher level? Why do you even need a try block there?

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