Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a difference between the two methods?

For example,

from datetime import date
today = date(2012, 10, 13)
repr(today)
'datetime.date(2012, 10, 13);

today.__repr__()
'datetime.date(2012, 10, 13)'

They seem to do the same thing, but why would someone want to use the latter over the regular repr?

share|improve this question
6  
Please accept answers to your questions. You're at 0% accept rate. –  larsmans Oct 13 '12 at 22:39

2 Answers 2

__repr__ method is used to implement custom result for repr(). It is used by repr(), str() (if __str__ is not defined). You shouldn't call __repr__ explicitly.

The difference is that repr() enforces the string as the returned type and repr() looks up __repr__ on a class object, not an instance itself:

>>>> class C(object):
....   def __repr__(self):
....     return 1 # invalid non-string value
....
>>>> c = C()
>>>> c.__repr__() # works
1
>>>> repr(c) # enforces the rule
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __repr__ returned non-repr (type 'int')
>>>> c # calls repr() implicitly
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __repr__ returned non-repr (type 'int')
>>>> str(c)  # also uses __repr__
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __str__ returned non-str (type 'int')
>>>> c.__repr__ = lambda: "a"
>>>> c.__repr__() # lookup on instance
'a'
>>>> repr(c) # old method from the class
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __repr__ returned non-repr (type 'int')
>>>>
share|improve this answer

It's the same thing

Think of repr() as containing the following code:

def repr(obj):
    return obj.__repr__()

All it does is call the object's __repr__() function. I'm not sure why anyone would need to call the object's __repr__() method explicitly. In fact, it's generally bad coding style to do so (it's confusing, and leads the programmer to ask questions like the one that you did just now).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.