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Here's what I'm trying to do:

When there's a new INSERT into the table ACCOUNTS, I need to update the row in ACCOUNTS where pk = NEW.edit_on by setting status='E' to denote that the particular (old) account has been edited.

DELIMITER $$

DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS `setEditStatus`$$
CREATE TRIGGER `setEditStatus` AFTER INSERT on ACCOUNTS
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
    update ACCOUNTS set status='E' where ACCOUNTS.pk = NEW.edit_on ;
END$$

DELIMITER ;

The requirement is NOT that I manipulate the newly inserted column, but an already existing column with pk = NEW.edit_on

However, I can't update the same table: Can't update table ACCOUNTS ... already used by the statement that invoked this trigger

Please suggest a workaround

PS: I have already gone through Updating table in trigger after update on the same table, Insert into same table trigger mysql, Update with after insert trigger on same table and mysql trigger with insert and update after insert on table but they dont seem to answer my question.

Edit

ACCOUNTS Table:

CREATE TABLE  `ACCOUNTS` (
  `pk` bigint(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `user_id` bigint(9) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `edit_on` bigint(10) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  `status` varchar(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'A',
  PRIMARY KEY (`pk`) USING BTREE) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=2147483726 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1
share|improve this question
    
How do you uniquely identify the rows in ACCOUNTS? If edit_on is your primary key, then how can you insert duplicates? –  pjama Oct 13 '12 at 23:21
    
I have edited the question to include the table structure. Please see. –  th3an0maly Oct 13 '12 at 23:26
    
if edit_on = 123 for a row where pk = 456, that means 456 is an edit on 123. Therefore, status should be updated to 'E' for 123 –  th3an0maly Oct 13 '12 at 23:36
    
There is no status column in your schema. –  pjama Oct 13 '12 at 23:40
    
oops.. sorry my bad. please see the edit now –  th3an0maly Oct 13 '12 at 23:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It seems that you can't do all this in a trigger. According to the documentation:

Within a stored function or trigger, it is not permitted to modify a table that is already being used (for reading or writing) by the statement that invoked the function or trigger.

According to this answer, it seems that you should:

create a stored procedure, that inserts into/Updates the target table, then updates the other row(s), all in a transaction.

With a stored proc you'll manually commit the changes (insert and update). I haven't done this in MySQL, but this post looks like a good example.

share|improve this answer
    
Does that mean I have to call the stored procedure from the trigger? –  th3an0maly Oct 14 '12 at 0:08
    
No, I believe you move the original INSERT query into the stored procedure, and call the proc instead of the query. Here's the syntax for MySQL: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/call.html –  pjama Oct 14 '12 at 1:59
    
I'm a little confused here. Do you mean move the original insert into a procedure and use a trigger to make the updates, or moving the whole logic into a stored procedure? –  th3an0maly Oct 14 '12 at 8:39
1  
Putting two statements (insert + update) in a stored procedure. If statements execute successfully, then you commit, otherwise rollback changes. –  pjama Oct 14 '12 at 19:27
    
good news. I've implemented that. It works fine. Except for the fact that I cant get the status (if or not the SP changed any rows) in my JDBC Template :( –  th3an0maly Oct 14 '12 at 20:09

Had the same problem but had to update a column with the id that was about to enter, so you can make an update should be done BEFORE and AFTER not BEFORE had no id so I did this trick

DELIMITER $$
DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS `codigo_video`$$
CREATE TRIGGER `codigo_video` BEFORE INSERT ON `videos` 
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
    DECLARE ultimo_id, proximo_id INT(11);
    SELECT id INTO ultimo_id FROM videos ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1;
    SET proximo_id = ultimo_id+1;
    SET NEW.cassette = CONCAT(NEW.cassette, LPAD(proximo_id, 5, '0'));
END$$
DELIMITER ;
share|improve this answer
    
I have to say, this is a very crude way to solve this issue because it banks on the premise that no entry was added/deleted (thus increasing the autoincrement value from what the MAX(id) + 1 would yield). Regardless it's the only solution I've found to accomplish what I need to and I feel like I can bank on that premise. I'm attempting (due to moving from PHP to Django) to rename all my primary keys from TABLENAME_id to id without breaking my application. Good stuff. –  Benjamin Oman Jul 3 '13 at 9:23

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