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I'm using Boost to do some matrix algebra. I'm trying to understand if this optimization does anything. Original:

matrix<double> DoSomething(matrix<double> a, matrix<double> b)
{
    return a + b; //for example
}

Optimization:

matrix<double>* DoSomething(matrix<double>* a, matrix<double>* b)
{
    return *a + *b; //for example
}

Basically, I assumed that using pointers as the parameters and the return type would prevent copying a large object. After reading through the source code, I'm wondering if Boost ublas basically takes care of this. It seems like you're always dealing with a reference in Boost's code.

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2 Answers 2

If you want the best performance pass references (or pointers) and return with std::move :

matrix<double>&& DoSomething(matrix<double>& a, matrix<double>& b)
{
    return std::move(a + b); 
}

So you avoid to copy the arguments and the return value.But you can use std::move only in C++11.Otherwise return a matrix:

matrix<double> DoSomething(matrix<double>& a, matrix<double>& b)
{
    return a+b; 
}
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1  
The inputs should probably be const references –  Hurkyl Oct 13 '12 at 23:21
1  
There's no need to call move on (a + b). It's a temporary, it's already an rvalue. Even if it wasn't a temporary, you don't need to call move when returning a local object. Also, you don't return rvalue references to local objects. That's the same as returning an lvalue reference, it's undefined behavior. Just return by value. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 13 '12 at 23:38

That's not an optimization. In fact, it's a disaster. Your "optimized" code returns a pointer to a temporary object that no longer exists when the function returns. If you try to fix this:

matrix<double>* DoSomething(matrix<double>* a, matrix<double>* b)
{
    return new Matrix<double>(*a + *b); //for example
}

Well, look what you just did there. You just asked to create a copy, since your new matrix is copy-constructed from the temporary that results from summing a and b. Worse, this code is now no longer exception safe and it's easy to screw up in the caller and not release the allocated matrix.

So leave it alone. It's already optimized, and you can easily break it or make it worse.

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