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I've started playing around with extern templates a bit and I've stumbled on an issue which I can't find any relevant information on. Say I have a class template with a non-template friend function (defined within the class template declaration). I declare some extern template instantiations for the class, but how do I declare the friend function as extern too?

Here is some example code:

// --- test.h ---

template <typename T>
class Foo {
  private:
    T value;
  public:
    friend void some_friend_function(Foo<T>& obj) {
      obj.value -= T(42);
    };

    void some_member_function(T rhs) { value += rhs; };

};

extern template class Foo<int>;
//extern void some_friend_function(Foo<int>&);  // I tried this also...


// --- test.cpp ---

#include "test.h"

template class Foo<int>;
//void some_friend_function(Foo<int>&);         // ... with this.

When I compile the above (with or without the commented lines), I only get the following exported symbol:

0000000000000000 W _ZN3FooIiE20some_member_functionEi

So, the non-template friend functions definitely don't get instantiated (and extern'd) along with the class template's explicit instantiation. Is this normal? At least, that's what GCC produces (tested on 4.6.3 and 4.7.2).

Is there any way that I can get the friend function to be marked extern? I know that this isn't a huge problem, since I can happily live with the friend functions being instantiated as needed (i.e., non-extern), but I'm curious to know if there is a way to do this, if not, was it an oversight or a deliberate thing?

EDIT: The obvious workarounds

My question is specifically about non-template friend functions, not about finding a workaround to avoid the issue, which is trivial. The first obvious workaround is this:

template <typename T>
class Foo {
  private:
    T value;
  public:
    template <typename U>
    friend void some_friend_function(Foo<U>& obj) {
      obj.value -= T(42);
    };
};

extern template class Foo<int>;
extern template void some_friend_function(Foo<int>&);

// --- in cpp file: ---

template class Foo<int>;
template void some_friend_function(Foo<int>&);

And another, which matches more closely but is more troublesome, is this:

template <typename T> class Foo;  // forward-declare.

template <typename T>
void some_friend_function(Foo<T>&);  // declaration.

template <typename T>
class Foo {
  private:
    T value;
  public:
    friend void some_friend_function<>(Foo<T>& obj);  // befriend the T-specialization.
};

template <typename T>
void some_friend_function(Foo<T>& obj) {  // definition.
  obj.value -= T(42);
};

extern template class Foo<int>;
extern template void some_friend_function(Foo<int>&);

// --- in cpp file: ---

template class Foo<int>;
template void some_friend_function(Foo<int>&);
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I don't think what you're asking for is possible. A friend function that has been defined inline is only discoverable via ADL. You can't get a pointer to that function and so externing it shouldn't be possible either. A simple workaround is to declare the friends signature in the class declaration and provide the definition outside. –  Praetorian Oct 14 '12 at 4:07
1  
@Prætorian "declare the friends signature in the class declaration and provide the definition outside." That's not possible for non-template friend functions of a class template, they have to be defined in the class template declaration. "A friend function that has been defined inline is only discoverable via ADL." I know, but doesn't that make them more like member functions of the class, and thus, shouldn't they be instantiated along with all the member functions when an explicit instantiation appears? It seems like a weird loophole, and the ISO standard is mute on that issue. –  Mikael Persson Oct 14 '12 at 4:43
    
@Mikael Persson: "[...]shouldn't they be instantiated[...]" 14.5.3/5: "When a function is defined in a friend function declaration in a class template, the function is defined at each instantiation of the class template. The function is defined even if it is never used.[...]". Is that what you were looking for in your comment? –  dyp Oct 14 '12 at 21:41
    
Another question: In your original example, what do you want to achieve? 11.4/3 => the function has external linkage, 11.4/5 => implicitly inline, 7.1.2/4 "An inline function with external linkage shall have the same address in all translation units." IMHO, you need not explicitly declare it extern. –  dyp Oct 14 '12 at 21:48
1  
I just realized that I've looked this up in the C++03 standard, whereas you have a C++11 tag. Things are different in the C++11 standard: 14.5.4/4: "function [defined in friend function decl] is instantiated when it's odr-used"; the rest stays the same -- see 11.3/4, 11.3/7, 7.1.2/4 (paragraph numbers have changed). –  dyp Oct 14 '12 at 22:00
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The effect of an "extern template class" is to declare an explicit instantiation to be available. The effect of explicit instantiation declarations do not apply to inline functions or template specializations (14.7.2 [temp.explicit] paragraph 10):

Except for inline functions and class template specializations, explicit instantiation declarations have the effect of suppressing the implicit instantiation of the entity to which they refer.

Since a friend function definition within a class definition is necessarily an inline function, it will stay an inline function independent of the explicit instantiation declaration of the template (and, as you correctly noted, it isn't a template and doesn't follow template instantiation rules anyway).

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