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My parent class, Course, has the method addStudent(Student s). My child class, BetterCourse, inherits from Course. Every time I try to run BetterCourse.addStudent(s), I get the following error:

error: no matching function for call to ‘BetterCourse::addStudent(Student (&)())’ note: candidates are: void Course::addStudent(Student)

I understand it's telling me addStudent() hasn't been defined in BetterCourse and that it's recommending I use the one present in the parent class, Course. This has me confused as the whole idea around inheritance is not needing to redefine inherited functions and variables.

Course is as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include "Student.h"

using namespace std;

class Course
{

    protected:
        string id;
        string name;

    public:
        Course();
        Course(string id, string name);     
        void addStudent(Student s);
};

Course::Course()
{
   //code
}

Course::Course(string id, string name)
{
   //code
}

void Course::addStudent(Student s) 
{
   //code
}

BetterCourse:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include "Course.h"

using namespace std;

class BetterCourse : public Course
{
    public:
        BetterCourse(string id, string name) : Course(id,name){};
};
share|improve this question
    
On which line are you getting the error? I don't see any call to addStudent so it's hard to tell what you're trying to do. –  Cheezmeister Oct 13 '12 at 23:34
    
don't forget about virtual member functions. publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/topic/… –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 23:40
    
why do you need virtual methods if you want to use implementation from the base class? –  Adrian Herea Oct 13 '12 at 23:43
    
For the method addStudent, that's right. But I already see the bugs searching for the virtual destructor, and at some point something will be virtual. After all, it was just a hint for the future, just as I like to mention en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_three_%28C%2B%2B_programming%29 -- questions should be for learning, or not? –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 14 '12 at 0:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From your error it seems that you for the first time get to the ugliest part of C++.

This:

Student s();

Is function declaration - not object definition. s type is Student (*)() so when you call:

BetterCourse bc; 
bc.addStudent(s);

You get your error - you don't have method to add functions returning Student.

Define Student in the following ways:

Student s;
Student s {}; // new C++11 way
Student s = Student(); // 
share|improve this answer
    
How's that for reading between the lines! +1 –  Cheezmeister Oct 13 '12 at 23:46
    
You are very correct! While I had defined constructors for Student that handled an empty parameter creation, I did not design addStudent() to deal with 'empty' objects as it were. I have added the appropriate arguments and the error has disappeared. Thank you :) –  Ensign Variable Oct 13 '12 at 23:53
    
I'm very glad to help. Don't forget to accept ;) –  PiotrNycz Oct 13 '12 at 23:55
    
It's known as the Most Vexing Parse. –  Neil Oct 14 '12 at 0:06

It sounds like you're actually calling the function 'addStudent' with an inappropriate argument. Could you show the code that is actually calling addStudent on the BetterCourse object? It sounds like you're using a reference to the student instead of the student object itself.

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you can not call BetterCourse.addStudent(s) you should create an object

BetterCourse obj;
obj.addStudent(s);

should work

If you want to call BetterCourse::addStudent(s) than declare addStudent(s) as static method

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