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public void check() {
    if (particle < 0) {
        if (point[3].equals(point[3]) == true) {
            check = true;
        }
        check = false;
    }
}

Shouldn't point[3] be equal to itself? making it true?

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2  
try: check = (p3.equals(p3)); saves you some if's! –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 23:42
    
don't do if (condition == true). it is the same as if (condition)! –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 23:46
    
@RudolfMühlbauer believe it or not but some people consider if( method() == true ) /* blah blah */ a good software engineering practice to indicate the return type of method(). While I strongly disagree, I've seen it as part of a coding standard for a project. Yes, a Java project :/ –  Tom Oct 13 '12 at 23:51
    
@Tom, everything is possible! I had quite some discussion with my professor about this topic - now i believe it should be if (cond). –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 23:52

4 Answers 4

Maybe you mean to say else check = false?

   public void check(){
     if(particle < 0){
        if(point[3].equals(point[3]) == true){
         check = true;
        }else{
          check = false;
        }
     }
  //here it is true
  }

or simply:

  public void check(){
     if(particle < 0){
        check = point[3].equals(point[3]);
     }
     //here it is true
 }
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You must return after check = true; from the function, or use else. Else it will fall down from the if and return false always

if (...) {
  check = true;
}
else {
  check = false;
}

public void check(){
    if(particle < 0){
        if(point[3].equals(point[3]) == true){
            check = true;
        }else{
          check = false;
        }
    }

}

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What? sorry, I'm only starting :L –  user1610541 Oct 13 '12 at 23:43
    
I believe an else would be more readable here than a return. And check = p3.equals(p3); would be even better yet. As long as we consider a condition like that worth checking anyway. –  Tom Oct 13 '12 at 23:44
    
@user1610541 what's happening in your code is, it first checks if particle is less than 0, then it checks if point[3].equals(point[3]). If yes, check becomes equal to true. THEN immediately after that, check becomes equal to false, because even if it was logically correct, there was a side-effect phenomena here, which changed the value of check to false. This is why it returned false always. When you return from the function OR use an else{} statement, the logic change of "check" becomes true and is returned from the check() function. –  Aniket Oct 13 '12 at 23:59
    
@user1610541 my wild guess is, you were once a VB programmer. –  Aniket Oct 14 '12 at 0:00

Try this:

public boolean check() {
    if (particle < 0) {
        return point[3].equals(point[3]);
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
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result is not the same as in the question: return value is changed, and the variable check is only set when particle >= 0 in the original code. –  Rudolf Mühlbauer Oct 13 '12 at 23:50

what about particle?

by convention point ought to be equal to itself, but you could always implement it otherwise.

but of course, the other reply is correct, this function will always end with check=false

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