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this is mostly a design question, but since I program in C++11 I prefer solutions/advices that use C++11.

Basically problem is that I want to make my class easily maintainable while avoiding using excessive locking.

The problem is simple :

I can avoid locking at the beginning of private class functiona if it is only called by public class function b that has locked the class mutex on on start of it. Maintenance hell is that in future it is not easy to see what method is calling what and there is a chance that somebody will just make b public, and make class thread unsafe.

So what is the optimal solution:

  • commenting b to say that it doesn't lock std::mutex because it is only called by a
  • using recursive_mutex and lock in every methods: seems wasteful
  • something else
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2  
I would say using recursive_mutex is safer. You should only incur a counter increment/decrement in the already-locked case, so the wastefulness is probably not a big factor if you're already locking. Contract by comment can come back to bite you, so I personally would be wary about that. The best solution, of course, would be to avoid locking through a redesign (e.g. have threads enqueue operations to a thread responsible for the object). –  chradcliffe Oct 14 '12 at 2:57

3 Answers 3

there is a chance that somebody will just make b public

You should not have to worry about that. If someone makes a private implementation detail into a public member without understanding the consequences, or how to use the function correctly, then you already have a maintenance nightmare. Do you also worry about them making all your data members public? Worrying about such things seems like a waste of time. If it isn't obvious the function is not meant to be public then rename it and add clear comments.

However ...

One alternative that is often used is to require a lock object to be passed to the function, that way it's harder to call it without locking the mutex, whether that locking is done by another member function or any other class:

class X
{
public:
    void frobnicate()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(this->mutex);
        frob_impl(lock);
    }

private:
    void frob_impl(const std::unique_lock<std::mutex>&)
    {
        // do it
    }

    std::mutex mutex;
};

If you want to be really paranoid about people changing the code to do stupid things you could add a check that the right mutex is locked:

    void frob_impl(const std::unique_lock<std::mutex>& lock)
    {
        assert( &this->mutex == lock.mutex() );
        // do it
    }

But if you don't trust later maintenance programmers how do you know they won't just remove that check?

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The simplest way to do it is to have an implementation class that does the work, but does not have a mutex member, and a wrapper class that holds the implementation class and a mutex. The wrapper then locks the mutex in every member function and then calls the implementation class. If the implementation calls another member function of itself then it knows the mutex is always locked. Since the wrapper member functions are just simple wrappers, it is easy to verify that they always lock the mutex.

class X{
    class Impl{
    private:
        int i,j;
        int bar(){ return i;}
        int baz(){ return j;}
    public:
        Impl():i(36),j(6){}
        int foo(){
            return bar()+baz();
        }
    };

    Impl impl;
    std::mutex m;
public:
    int foo(){
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(m);
        return impl.foo();
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
ah, I wish cpp had a way to express that without writing a wrapper for every function. Like "class Wrapper wraps class Impl, and on every method entry it performs : std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(m);" –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 16 '12 at 8:38
    
@NoSenseEtAl, have a look at the EXECUTE-AROUND POINTER pattern –  Jonathan Wakely Oct 17 '12 at 12:05
    
cool, now when I see it it is obvious... but I would never figured it out on my own. :D –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 17 '12 at 12:27

That's a good question. It is usually good idea to separate public interface from implementation as well as separate functionality from multi-threading issues.

I have been using recursive mutex, then I had method names with and without "_locked" suffixes etc. It was still a burden to maintain and extend, locking every time was slow (recursive mutex sucks, too), and I constantly had to trace the data/call path to figure out what the heck is going on. Well, debugging deadlocks was quite easy — unprotected access was a lot more fun.

These days I usually implement a class without worrying about a mutex, and then protect it from "unlocked" access by hiding it behind a wall implemented as a "proxy" pattern. It was working great for me for at least a few years, no complaints so far. This code should give you an idea:

#include <cstdio>
#include <mutex>
#include <utility>

class SomeClass {
  public:
    explicit SomeClass(int v) : v(v) {}

    void foo() { printf("\t\tCALLED foo(%d)\n", v); }
    void bar() { foo(); printf("\t\tCALL bar(%d)\n", v); }

  private:
    int v;
};

template <typename T>
class Protector {
    std::mutex m_;
    T          c_;
  public:
    template <typename ...Args>
    Protector(Args && ...args)
        : m_(), c_(std::forward<Args>(args)...)
    {}

    class Interface {
        Protector *p_;

        Interface(const Interface &) = delete;
        Interface & operator = (const Interface &) = delete;

      public:
        Interface(Protector *p) : p_(p) {
            printf("\t+++++ Lock! +++++\n");
            p_->m_.lock();
        }

        Interface(Interface && rhs) : p_(rhs.p_) { rhs.p_ = nullptr; }
        T *operator->() { return p_ ? &p_->c_ : nullptr; }
        ~Interface() {
            if (p_) {
                printf("\t----- Unlock! -----\n");
                p_->m_.unlock();
            }
        }
    };

    Interface lock() { return Interface(this); }
    Interface operator ->() { return lock(); }

    Protector(const Protector &) = delete;
    Protector & operator = (const Protector &) = delete;
};

int main()
{
    Protector<SomeClass> p(12345);
    printf("--*-- Doing batch access! --*--\n");
    {
        auto c = p.lock();
        c->foo();
        c->bar();
    }
    printf("--*-- Doing silly access! --*--\n");
    p->foo();
    p->bar();
    printf("Done!\n");
}

Example run:

$ clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ -O4 -Wall -pedantic -o test ./test.cpp 
$ ./test 
--*-- Doing batch access! --*--
    +++++ Lock! +++++
        CALLED foo(12345)
        CALLED foo(12345)
        CALL bar(12345)
    ----- Unlock! -----
--*-- Doing silly access! --*--
    +++++ Lock! +++++
        CALLED foo(12345)
    ----- Unlock! -----
    +++++ Lock! +++++
        CALLED foo(12345)
        CALL bar(12345)
    ----- Unlock! -----
Done!
$ 

Hope it helps.

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