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I am implementing my own system call in linux. It is calling the rename system call inside it. It uses a user argument (below is the code) to pass the code to the rename.

Here is the basic code:

int sys_mycall(const char __user * inputFile)   {

//
// Code to generate my the "fileName"
//
//

old_fs = get_fs();
set_fs(KERNEL_DS);

    ans =  sys_renameat(AT_FDCWD, fileName, AT_FDCWD, inputFile);

set_fs(old_fs);

    return ans;

}

I have two doubts here.

  1. I am using the old_fs = get_fs();,set_fs(KERNEL_DS); and set_fs(old_fs); to hack around the actual call to sys_rename because there was an error. I got the answer from this question: allocate user-space memory from kernel ... Is this a right work around?
  2. How to call otherwise a system call from a system call

EDIT:

int sys_myfunc(const char __user * inputFileUser)   {


    char inputFile[255];
    int l = 0;
    while(inputFileUser[l] != '\0') l++;

    if(l==0)
        return -10; 

    if(copy_from_user(inputFile,inputFileUser,l+1)< 0 ) return -20;
//
//GENERATE fileName here
//
//

    char fileName[255];
    return  sys_renameat(AT_FDCWD, inputFile, AT_FDCWD, fileName);

}

The following still returns -1. Why? I copied the data to kernel space.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

I wanted to show exactly how the correct way to achieve what footy wants, but my original answer grew too long, I decided to put the solution in a separate answer. I'll split the code into parts, and explain what each fragment does.

Remember that since we reuse kernel code, the code in this post and the resulting function must be licensed under the GPLv2 license.

First, we start by declaring a one-parameter syscall.

SYSCALL_DEFINE1(myfunc, const char __user *, oldname)
{

In the kernel, stack space is a scarce resource. You do not create local arrays; you always use dynamic memory management. Fortunately, there are some very useful functions like __getname(), so it is very little additional code. The important thing is to remember to release whatever memory you use when you are done with it.

As this syscall is basically a variant of rename, we reuse almost all of the fs/namei.c:sys_renameat() code. First, the local variable declarations. There are a lot, too; as I said, stack is scarce in kernel, and you won't see much more local variables than this in any syscall function:

    struct dentry *old_dir, *new_dir;
    struct dentry *old_dentry, *new_dentry;
    struct dentry *trap;
    struct nameidata oldnd, newnd;
    char *from;
    char *to = __getname();
    int error;

The first change to the sys_renameat() is on the char *to = __getname(); line above, already. It allocates PATH_MAX+1 bytes dynamically, and must be released using __putname() after it is no longer needed. This is the correct way to declare a temporary buffer for a file or directory name.

To construct the new path (to), we also need to be able to access the old name (from) directly. Because of the kernel-userspace barrier, we cannot just access oldname directly. So, we create an in-kernel copy of it:

    from = getname(oldname);
    if (IS_ERR(from)) {
        error = PTR_ERR(from);
        goto exit;
    }

Although many C programmers have been taught that goto is evil, this is the exception: error handling. Instead of having to remember all the cleanup we need to do (and we already need to do __putname(to) at minimum), we put the cleanup at the end of the function, and skip to the correct point, exit being the last one. error holds the error number, of course.

At this point of our function, we can access from[0] up to the first '\0', or up to (and including) from[PATH_MAX], whichever is first. It is a normal kernel-side data, and is accessed in the ordinary fashion you would in any C code.

You also have reserved the memory for the new name as to[0] up to and including to[PATH_MAX]. Remember to make sure it too is terminated using \0 (in to[PATH_MAX] = '\0' or an earlier index).

After constructing the contents for to, we need to do the path lookups. Unlike renameat(), we cannot use user_path_parent(). We can, however, look at what user_path_parent() does, and do the same work -- adapting to our own needs, of course. It turns out it just calls do_path_lookup() with error checking. So, the two user_path_parent() calls and their error checks can be replaced with

    error = do_path_lookup(AT_FDCWD, from, LOOKUP_PARENT, &oldnd);
    if (error)
        goto exit0;

    error = do_path_lookup(AT_FDCWD, to, LOOKUP_PARENT, &newnd);
    if (error)
        goto exit1;

Note that exit0 is a new label not found in the original renameat(). We need a new label because at exit, we only have to; but at exit0, we have both to and from. After exit0, we have to, from, and oldnd, and so on.

Next, we can reuse the bulk of sys_renameat(). It does all the hard work at renaming. To conserve space, I'll omit my ramblings on exactly what it does, since you can trust that if rename() works, it'll work too.

    error = -EXDEV;
    if (oldnd.path.mnt != newnd.path.mnt)
        goto exit2;

    old_dir = oldnd.path.dentry;
    error = -EBUSY;
    if (oldnd.last_type != LAST_NORM)
        goto exit2;

    new_dir = newnd.path.dentry;
    if (newnd.last_type != LAST_NORM)
        goto exit2;

    error = mnt_want_write(oldnd.path.mnt);
    if (error)
        goto exit2;

    oldnd.flags &= ~LOOKUP_PARENT;
    newnd.flags &= ~LOOKUP_PARENT;
    newnd.flags |= LOOKUP_RENAME_TARGET;

    trap = lock_rename(new_dir, old_dir);

    old_dentry = lookup_hash(&oldnd);
    error = PTR_ERR(old_dentry);
    if (IS_ERR(old_dentry))
        goto exit3;
    /* source must exist */
    error = -ENOENT;
    if (!old_dentry->d_inode)
        goto exit4;
    /* unless the source is a directory trailing slashes give -ENOTDIR */
    if (!S_ISDIR(old_dentry->d_inode->i_mode)) {
        error = -ENOTDIR;
        if (oldnd.last.name[oldnd.last.len])
            goto exit4;
        if (newnd.last.name[newnd.last.len])
            goto exit4;
    }
    /* source should not be ancestor of target */
    error = -EINVAL;
    if (old_dentry == trap)
        goto exit4;
    new_dentry = lookup_hash(&newnd);
    error = PTR_ERR(new_dentry);
    if (IS_ERR(new_dentry))
        goto exit4;
    /* target should not be an ancestor of source */
    error = -ENOTEMPTY;
    if (new_dentry == trap)
        goto exit5;

    error = security_path_rename(&oldnd.path, old_dentry,
                     &newnd.path, new_dentry);
    if (error)
        goto exit5;

    error = vfs_rename(old_dir->d_inode, old_dentry,
                   new_dir->d_inode, new_dentry);

At this point, all the work has been done, and only releasing the locks, memory, and so on taken by the code above, is left. If everything was successful at this point, error == 0, and we do all cleanup. If we had a problem, error contains the error code, and we have jumped to the correct label to do the cleanup necessary to the point where the error occurred. If the vfs_rename() failed -- it does the actual operation --, we doo all cleanup.

However, compared to the original code, we got hold of from very first (exit), to just after (exit0), followed by the dentry lookups. So, we need to move releasing them to their correct locations (near the very end, since they were done first. Cleanups occur, of course, in the reverse order):

exit5:
    dput(new_dentry);
exit4:
    dput(old_dentry);
exit3:
    unlock_rename(new_dir, old_dir);
    mnt_drop_write(oldnd.path.mnt);
exit2:
    path_put(&newnd.path);
exit1:
    path_put(&oldnd.path);
exit0:
    putname(from);
exit:
    __putname(to);
    return error;
}

And here we are done.

Of course, there are a lot of details to consider above in the parts we copied from sys_renameat() -- and like I said in the other answer, you should not just copy code like this, but refactor the common code into a helper function; that makes maintenance much easier. Fortunately, because we kept all the checks from renameat() -- we do the path manipulation before any of the renameat() code was copied -- we can be sure that all the necessary checks are done. It's just as if the user specified the manipulated path herself and called renameat().

If you were to do the modification after some checks have already been done, the situation would be much more complicated. You would have to think what those checks are, how your modifications impact on them, and almost always, re-do those checks.

To remind any reader, the reason you cannot just create a filename or any other string in your own syscall and then call another syscall, is that your just-created string resides on the kernel side of the kernel-userspace boundary, while syscalls expect the data to reside on the other, userspace side. While on x86 you can accidentally pierce the boundary from the kernel side, it does not mean you should do so: there are copy_from_user() and copy_to_user() and their derivatives like strncpy_from_user() that must be used for this purpose. It is not a question of having to do magic to call another syscall, but about where (in-kernel, or userspace) the data supplied is.

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Thanks for the wonderful answer. I will implement it tonight (and update here). This answer deserves a lot of appreciation. Thanks again. Perhaps I didnot know this because there is not a lot of material on the internet I can refer to easily. This question deserves a better title I think for easy SEO for people who are stuck like me. –  footy Oct 15 '12 at 16:09
    
I have another question if you are free that deserves a look I think: stackoverflow.com/questions/12886593/… ... If you are free go through it. I donot know why it was downvoted. –  footy Oct 15 '12 at 16:12
    
I specifically opened a bounty for you and gave it. This answer deserved it for your effort! Thanks –  footy Oct 17 '12 at 12:41
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Hm.. linux-3.6.2/fs/namei.c contains many similar situations. For example, the rename syscall is actually defined as

SYSCALL_DEFINE2(rename, const char __user *, oldname, const char __user *, newname)
{
    return sys_renameat(AT_FDCWD, oldname, AT_FDCWD, newname);
}

In other words, there is no problem in calling a syscall from another syscall. The issue is that the pointer arguments are userspace pointers, whereas you're trying to supply a kernel pointer: your fileName should be allocated in userspace, but yours is in kernelspace.

The correct solution is to factor out the common code from the two functions (yours and sys_renameat() in fs/namei.c), then call the function from both syscalls. Assuming you're not trying to get this included upstream -- if you are, then it is refactoring and rethinking time --, you can trivially copy the contents of sys_renameat into your own function; it's not that big. It's also a useful point to familiarize yourself with the necessary checks and locking needed for filesystem operations such as this.


Edited in an effort to explain the issue and the solution:

In a very real sense, memory allocated by a normal process (userspace memory) and memory allocated by the kernel (kernelspace) are completely separated by the kernel-userspace barrier.

Your code ignores that barrier, and should not work at all. (It probably works somewhat on x86, because the kernel-userspace barrier is easily pierced from the kernel side on that architecture.) You also use a 256 bytes of stack for a file name, which is a no-no: Kernel stack is a very limited resource, and should be used sparingly.

A normal process (userspace process) cannot access any kernel memory. You can try, it won't work. This is the reason the barrier exists. (There are certain embedded systems that have hardware that simply does not support such a barrier, but let's ignore those for the purposes of this discussion. And remember that even though on x86 the barrier is easily pierced from the kernel side, it does not mean it is not there. Don't be a dick and assume because it seems to work for you, it is somehow correct.)

The nature of the barrier is such that on most architectures, the barrier exists for the kernel, too.

To help kernel programmers, pointers that point across the barrier into userspace, are marked __user. This means you cannot just dereference them and expect them to work; you need to use copy_from_user() and copy_to_user(). It is not just syscall parameters: when you access userspace data from the kernel, you need to use those two functions.

All syscalls work on userspace data. Every pointer you see, is (or should be!) marked __user. Every syscall does all the necessary work to access the data from userspace.

Your problem is that you are trying to supply kernelspace data, inputFile, to a syscall. It will not work, because the syscall will always try to reach through the barrier, but inputFile is on the same side of the barrier!

There is really no sane way to copy inputFile to the other side of the barrier. I mean, of course there are ways it can be done, and it is not even that difficult, but it just would not be sane.

So, let us explore the correct solution I described above, and which footy has already rejected once.

First of all, let's see what the renameat syscall actually looks like in current (3.6.2) Linux kernel (remember that this code is licensed under GPLv2). The rename syscall simply calls it using sys_renameat(AT_FDCWD, oldname, AT_FDCWD, newname). I'll insert my explanations of what the code does:

SYSCALL_DEFINE4(renameat, int, olddfd, const char __user *, oldname,
                int, newdfd, const char __user *, newname)
{
        struct dentry *old_dir, *new_dir;
        struct dentry *old_dentry, *new_dentry;
        struct dentry *trap;
        struct nameidata oldnd, newnd;
        char *from;
        char *to;
        int error;

In the kernel, stack is a limited resource. You can use quite a few variables, but any local arrays would be a serious problem. The above local variable list is pretty much the largest you'll see in a typical syscall.

For the rename call, the function must locate the parent directories containing the file names first:

        error = user_path_parent(olddfd, oldname, &oldnd, &from);
        if (error)
                goto exit;

Note: after this point, the old directory and path must be released after use by calling path_put(&oldnd.path); putname(from);.

        error = user_path_parent(newdfd, newname, &newnd, &to);
        if (error)
                goto exit1;

Note: after this point, the new directory and path must be released after use by calling path_put(&newnd.path); putname(to);.

The next step is to check the two reside on the same filesystem:

        error = -EXDEV;
        if (oldnd.path.mnt != newnd.path.mnt)
                goto exit2;

The last component in the directories must be a normal directory:

        old_dir = oldnd.path.dentry;
        error = -EBUSY;
        if (oldnd.last_type != LAST_NORM)
                goto exit2;

        new_dir = newnd.path.dentry;
        if (newnd.last_type != LAST_NORM)
                goto exit2;

and the mount containing the directories must be writable. Note that this will apply a lock to the mount if successful, and must then be always paired with a mnt_drop_write(oldnd.path.mnt) call before the syscall returns.

        error = mnt_want_write(oldnd.path.mnt);
        if (error)
                goto exit2;

Next, the nameidata lookup flags are updated to reflect that the directories are already known:

        oldnd.flags &= ~LOOKUP_PARENT;
        newnd.flags &= ~LOOKUP_PARENT;
        newnd.flags |= LOOKUP_RENAME_TARGET;

Next, the two directories are locked for the duration of the rename. This must be paired with the corresponding unlock call, unlock_rename(new_dir, old_dir).

        trap = lock_rename(new_dir, old_dir);

Next, the actual existing file is looked up. If this is successful, the dentry must be released by calling dput(old_dentry):

        old_dentry = lookup_hash(&oldnd);
        error = PTR_ERR(old_dentry);
        if (IS_ERR(old_dentry))
                goto exit3;
        /* source must exist */
        error = -ENOENT;
        if (!old_dentry->d_inode)
                goto exit4;
        /* unless the source is a directory trailing slashes give -ENOTDIR */
        if (!S_ISDIR(old_dentry->d_inode->i_mode)) {
                error = -ENOTDIR;
                if (oldnd.last.name[oldnd.last.len])
                        goto exit4;
                if (newnd.last.name[newnd.last.len])
                        goto exit4;
        }
        /* source should not be ancestor of target */
        error = -EINVAL;
        if (old_dentry == trap)
                goto exit4;

The entry for the new filename is also looked up (it may exist, after all). Again, if successful, this dentry must also be released using dput(new_dentry) afterwards:

        new_dentry = lookup_hash(&newnd);
        error = PTR_ERR(new_dentry);
        if (IS_ERR(new_dentry))
                goto exit4;
        /* target should not be an ancestor of source */
        error = -ENOTEMPTY;
        if (new_dentry == trap)
                goto exit5;

At this point, the function has ascertained that everything is in order. Next, it must check if the operation may proceed (with respect to access modes et cetera), by calling security_path_rename(struct path *old_dir, struct dentry *old_dentry, struct path *new_dir, struct dentry *new_dentry). (The identity details of the userspace process are maintained in current.)

        error = security_path_rename(&oldnd.path, old_dentry,
                                     &newnd.path, new_dentry);
        if (error)
                goto exit5;

If there was no objection to the rename, then the actual rename can be done using vfs_rename(struct inode *old_dir, struct dentry *old_dentry, struct inode *new_dir, struct dentry *new_dentry):

        error = vfs_rename(old_dir->d_inode, old_dentry,
                           new_dir->d_inode, new_dentry);

At this point, all the work is done (successfully if error is zero), and the only thing left is to release the various lookups

exit5:
        dput(new_dentry);
exit4:
        dput(old_dentry);
exit3:
        unlock_rename(new_dir, old_dir);
        mnt_drop_write(oldnd.path.mnt);
exit2:
        path_put(&newnd.path);
        putname(to);
exit1:
        path_put(&oldnd.path);
        putname(from);
exit:
        return error;
}

That's it for the rename operation. As you can see, there is no explicit copy_from_user() to be seen. The user_path_parent() calls getname() which calls getname_flags(), which does it. If you ignore all the necessary checking, it boils down to

char *result = __getname();  /* Reserve PATH_MAX+1 bytes of kernel memory for one file name */
in    len;

len = strncpy_from_user(result, old/newname, PATH_MAX);
if (len <= 0) {
    __putname(result);
    /* An error occurred, abort! */
}

if (len >= PATH_MAX) {
    __putname(result);
    /* path is too long, abort! */
}

/* Finally, add it to the audit context for the current process. */
audit_getname(result);

and, after it is no longer needed,

putname(result);

So, footy, there is no simple solution to your problem. There is no single function call that will magically make your syscall work. You will have to rewrite it, looking at how the stuff is properly done in fs/namei.c. It is not difficult, but you must be careful and meticulous to do it -- and most of all accept that an approach of "just trying to get this simple thing work with minimal changes" will not work for this.

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I am sorry, could you rephrase the 2nd para :P. I am a noob –  footy Oct 14 '12 at 1:10
2  
@footy: The kernel and normal processes have a very real boundary between them. You are trying to ignore that boundary. When in kernel, you must use copy_from_user() to obtain data from userspace, and copy_to_user() to store data to userspace, to pass the boundary. That is why the pointers are labeled __user: to remind you. There is no issue in kernel code calling other kernel code, either: Your problem is that you have fileName on the kernel side of the boundary, whereas the function you are calling expects it to be on the other, userspace, side. –  Nominal Animal Oct 14 '12 at 6:01
    
So all I have to do is copy_from_user() my data? To remove the hack :) PS: Thanks for that nice explanation! –  footy Oct 14 '12 at 18:29
    
Have a look at the question edit. It still fails :( –  footy Oct 15 '12 at 0:10
1  
@footy: There is no fix to your code, it's all wrong. You need a total rewrite. I've explained exactly why and how in this answer, and an example one in a new answer. –  Nominal Animal Oct 15 '12 at 6:28
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