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So basically, I'm writing a program to take in a set of data and input the results into a vector of structures. However, the issue I am having is with the end of file flag never being set in my while loop located in the main function

int main()
{
ifstream machineRecords;
machineRecords.open ("records.txt");
if (machineRecords.fail())
{
    cout << "Failed to open \'records.txt\' please make sure it is in the same directory as the executable.";
    exit(1);
}

char tempChar;
string record;
do
{
    int LINE = 0;
    for (int x = 0; x <= 11; x++)
    {
        cout << "Begin storing characters in record" << endl;
        do  //Stores one character at a time into the node string until it discovers the end of the node
        {
            tempChar = machineRecords.get();
            record += tempChar;
            cout << "||" << tempChar << endl;
            //_getch();
        } while (tempChar != '|' && tempChar != '\n');
        eraseCharFromString(record, '|');       //Removes ending tag character
        eraseCharFromString(record, '\n');  //Removes any sneaky newline characters

        cout << "Record: " << record << endl;

        switch(x)
        {
            case 0:
                machines[LINE].idNumber = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 1:
                machines[LINE].description = record;
                break;
            case 2:
                machines[LINE].purchaseDate.month = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 3:
                machines[LINE].purchaseDate.day = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 4:
                machines[LINE].purchaseDate.year = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 5:
                machines[LINE].cost = atof(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 6:
                machines[LINE].history.failRate = atof(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 7:
                machines[LINE].history.downDays = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 8:
                machines[LINE].history.lastServiced.month = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 9:
                machines[LINE].history.lastServiced.day = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
            case 10:
                machines[LINE].history.lastServiced.year = atoi(record.c_str());
                break;
        }
        record = "";
        _getch();
    }

    tempChar = machineRecords.get();
    if (machineRecords.fail())
    {
        cout << "DONE" << endl;
        break;
    }
    else
    {
        machineRecords.putback(tempChar);
    }

    ++LINE;
    _getch();
} while (!machineRecords.eof());    //While not at the end of the file

recordFromLastDate(1999);

machineRecords.close();
_getch();
return 0;
}

Any formatting errors are SO's problem.

But anyway, even when I try to test read another character after each line, it simply will not trigger the eof flag. I really have no clue why not.

Unfortunately I don't have the time to rewrite too much the code because of a ton of other projects for midterms, but I really wanted to know if I was doing something completely wrong or what.

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2  
eof() is set when the last read operation failed because of an end-of-file condition. –  Vaughn Cato Oct 14 '12 at 0:58
    
What's with the _getch? –  Omnifarious Oct 14 '12 at 1:07
    
@Omnifarious, I was just using that to do some step-by-step output, since I'm not quite as familiar with steps and breakpoints yet. –  DatapawWolf Oct 14 '12 at 18:38
    
@Vaughn, yeah, that's what I was thinking when I added tempChar = machineRecords.get(); if (machineRecords.fail()) { cout << "DONE" << endl; break; } else { machineRecords.putback(tempChar); } But I guess I hadn't done something correctly. –  DatapawWolf Oct 14 '12 at 18:39
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EOF only set when you read a character beyond end of file, so it is wise to think EOF will be set after machineRecords.get() that you never test its return value, so subsequent reads will set failure bit of the stream and EOF will be ignored. just test result of machineRecords.get() with -1 to catch EOF or error before continue

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I think you should try something like,

char ch;
ifstream ifile("filename");

ifile.get(ch);   /*Called as prime read. Use getline() or ifile>>line where line is a string depending on your requirement*/
while(ifile)
{
do your work;//
......
......
......
ifile.get(ch);
}

This works in almost all types of files.It first gets the data from the stream and then checks the state of the stream at the beginning of while loop.If it fails,it will immediately execute the statement after the while loop otherwise it will continue till EOF is reached where the stream enters fail state.

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You should use

} while (!machineRecords.good()); 

as your final condition.

It covers eofbit, failbit and badbit, instead of just eofbit, so the loop also finishes if eof isn't reached because reading failed before.

You can look it up here: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/ios/good/

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