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Each process gets a 4 GB of virtual address space and out of 4 GB, user space gets 2 GB. And out of this 2 GB, I want to read the whole stack of memory allocated to a process by an OS.

Suppose I declare a local array of size 2000,000 ( char chrArray[2000000]; ) on the stack. There are couple of questions I would like to ask.

1) Using gcc and cygwin, I am able to read its content without initialization but its content is mostly empty ( I used %c to print array into a file) or some junk data at the end of this array. I took one string present in the junk data and looked for it in the memory dump (taken with DumpIt tool) but this string was not present in memory dump.

My question is where that junk data came from them? Was it located in hard-disk?

2) I thought of using fork() to declare char array in each child process but I guess, it copies the whole address space of parent process and uses Copy-on-Write technique, so it seems not useful. Am I right at this interpretation?

3) What I want is to declare an array of big size and every time it is mapped to some new physical memory addresses. Is this achievable and if yes, how?

And by repeating this process, I want to scan whole memory.

I tried bash script to run this program many times, but it always starts from same virtual base address.

I tried to run a for loop which declares (say) 10 char arrays but by printing their base addresses, I see the same addresses for all arrays.

I am using Windows 7 and C program and I think, I am lacking some required OS knowledge.

Thanks.

P.S. If somebody is curios why I am doing this, I am doing research in this area.

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Are you sure you declared a stack array? Usually declaring an array of such size results in stack overflow. –  dasblinkenlight Oct 14 '12 at 1:24
    
Yea. 2000000 was the maximum size I tried and worked. I used 3000000 and it said some segmentation fault and core dumped. Though on Ubunutu, maximum allowed size for me was 8000000. –  Junaid Oct 14 '12 at 1:28
    
The default stack on many Linux system is 8MB, I seem to remember it used to be 1MB on Widows, but apparently they increased to 2 now. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 14 '12 at 1:29
    
Actually I want to scan whole memory by repeating this process. –  Junaid Oct 14 '12 at 1:42
    
You can't scan all of your address space this way, since parts of your address space won't be mapped. You'll either need to catch the relevant signal or ask the OS for a list of mappings. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 14 '12 at 2:06
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2 Answers

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Suppose I declare a local array of size 2000,000 ( char chrArray[2000000]; )

This is dangerous. If you run out of stack, your program will crash.

some junk data at the end of this array.

The stack grows downwards, so the end of the array (the higher part) corresponds to the older portion of the stack. The data is zeroed when your program starts, and as your program runs it will write data to the stack. So the "junk data" is just leftover local variables and other bits of stack frames from functions that you've called. (Most OSs zero your process memory using a specialized copy-on-write technique -- I say "specialized" because it's easy to copy a block of memory when you know the entire block is zeroes.)

Was it located in hard-disk?

Data from the hard disk only shows up in your memory space on purpose. When your process reuses memory from another process, the memory is zeroed first.

I thought of using fork() to declare char array in each child process but I guess, it copies the whole address space of parent process and uses Copy-on-Write technique, so it seems not useful. Am I right at this interpretation?

This is tagged Windows, which does not have fork() except when you're using Cygwin. I don't know about Cygwin's implementation. I'm not sure what you're trying to accomplish, or what you'd expect, but that is exactly how fork() is supposed to behave. The fork() call duplicates an entire process, including the memory.

What I want is to declare an array of big size and every time it is mapped to some new physical memory addresses. Is this achievable and if yes, how?

User-space programs do not work with physical memory addresses, only virtual memory addresses. No, it is not possible.

Worse yet, suppose you allocate an array char arr[10000] at virtual address 1000, and suppose virtual address 1000 corresponds to physical address 6000.

  • The address of &arr[0] is virtual address 1000 and physical address 6000... unless your process gets swapped out, at which point it has no physical address at all. So physical addresses don't always exist.

  • When your process gets swapped back in, then &arr[0] will still be virtual address 1000 but it might be physical address 6000 or 8000 or 999000... who knows?

  • The address of &arr[1000] is always virtual address 2000, but it might be physical address 10000 or 85000 or something completely different... who knows?

Further reading: You may wish to read about the "virtual memory" subsystem of operating systems.

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To avoid security problems, when a physical page is allocated most kernels make sure that physical page contains no data (e.g. fill it with zeros). Otherwise one process could fill a page with sensitive information (e.g. passwords) and then free it, and another process could allocate that page and access the sensitive data.

Therefore, the junk you're seeing in your array is your own junk.

When a process is first started a lot of things typically happen before main() gets control. These things may include dynamic linking and setting up system libraries, executing constructors (for C++), etc. This means that things get put on your stack (and then removed from your stack) before your code runs. This is the junk you're seeing.

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