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I installed a thread-specific windows hook to monitor messages sent to WndProc. It worked at first. However, after I pressed Tab about 19 times to move focus around a form, my hook callback is nolonger called. This happened regaless of whether I pressed Tab quickly or slowly. Can anybody explain what is really going on?

Below is the code I wrote. I tested it on Windows 7 64 bit.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace HookTest
{
    static class Program
    {
        private const int WH_CALLWNDPROC = 4;

        private delegate IntPtr HookProc(int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

        private class MainForm : Form
        {
            private Button button1;
            private TextBox textBox1;

            public MainForm()
            {
                this.button1 = new System.Windows.Forms.Button();
                this.textBox1 = new System.Windows.Forms.TextBox();
                this.SuspendLayout();
                // 
                // button1
                // 
                this.button1.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(12, 38);
                this.button1.Name = "button1";
                this.button1.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(75, 23);
                this.button1.TabIndex = 0;
                this.button1.Text = "Button 1";
                this.button1.UseVisualStyleBackColor = true;
                // 
                // textBox1
                // 
                this.textBox1.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(12, 12);
                this.textBox1.Name = "textBox1";
                this.textBox1.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(100, 20);
                this.textBox1.TabIndex = 1;
                // 
                // MainForm
                // 
                this.Controls.Add(this.textBox1);
                this.Controls.Add(this.button1);
                this.Name = "MainForm";
                this.Text = "Main Form";
                this.ResumeLayout(false);
                this.PerformLayout();
            }
        }

        private static IntPtr hWndProcHook = IntPtr.Zero;
        private static int messageCount = 0;

        [DllImport("Kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        public static extern IntPtr GetModuleHandle(string lpModuleName);

        [DllImport("Kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        public static extern uint GetCurrentThreadId();

        [DllImport("User32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        private static extern IntPtr SetWindowsHookEx(int idHook,
            HookProc lpfn, IntPtr hMod, uint dwThreadId);

        [DllImport("User32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
        private static extern bool UnhookWindowsHookEx(IntPtr hhk);

        [DllImport("User32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
        private static extern IntPtr CallNextHookEx(IntPtr hhk, int nCode,
            IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);

        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            InstallHook();
            Application.Run(new MainForm());
            UninstallHook();
        }

        private static void InstallHook()
        {
            if (Program.hWndProcHook == IntPtr.Zero)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Hooking...");

                Program.hWndProcHook = SetWindowsHookEx(
                    WH_CALLWNDPROC,
                    WndProcHookCallback,
                    GetModuleHandle(null),
                    GetCurrentThreadId());

                if(Program.hWndProcHook != IntPtr.Zero)
                    Console.WriteLine("Hooked successfully.");
                else
                    Console.WriteLine("Failed to hook.");
            }
        }

        private static void UninstallHook()
        {
            if (Program.hWndProcHook != IntPtr.Zero)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Unhooking...");

                if (UnhookWindowsHookEx(Program.hWndProcHook))
                    Console.WriteLine("Unhooked successfully.");
                else
                    Console.WriteLine("Failed to unhook.");

                Program.hWndProcHook = IntPtr.Zero;
            }
        }

        private static IntPtr WndProcHookCallback(int nCode, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("WndProcHookCallback {0}", Program.messageCount++);

            return CallNextHookEx(Program.hWndProcHook, nCode, wParam, lParam);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Your code worked fine for me and I pressed tab a lot more than 19 times. Is there any other information you can provide? How are you verifying that it is not working? I just watched the Output pane in VS. – nick_w Oct 14 '12 at 2:46
    
I verify that it is working by running in debug mode and looking at the output window. If the hook is working it should write "WndProcHookCallback #" to the output window where # is an increasing integer. If no more such message is written to the output window, the hook procedure is no longer called. – Tu Le Hong Oct 14 '12 at 3:51
    
This hook doesn't do anything useful. What does the real code in the hook callback look like? – Hans Passant Oct 14 '12 at 10:52
    
It's already the real code. – Tu Le Hong Oct 18 '12 at 1:29
up vote 3 down vote accepted

While testing your program I got the following error

CallbackOnCollectedDelegate was detected
Message: A callback was made on a garbage collected delegate of type 'Sandbox Form!Sandbox_Form.Program+HookProc::Invoke'. This may cause application crashes, corruption and data loss. When passing delegates to unmanaged code, they must be kept alive by the managed application until it is guaranteed that they will never be called.

I believe the problem is the delegate that is implicitly created to be passed in to SetWindowsHookEx for the callback is getting garbage collected. By explicitly creating a variable for the delegate and keeping it in scope I think it will make your problem go away, when I modified InstallHook to the following I could no longer re-create the error.

private static HookProc hookProcDelegate;

private static void InstallHook()
{
    if (Program.hWndProcHook == IntPtr.Zero)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hooking...");

        hookProcDelegate = new HookProc(WndProcHookCallback);

        Program.hWndProcHook = SetWindowsHookEx(
            WH_CALLWNDPROC,
            hookProcDelegate,
            GetModuleHandle(null),
            GetCurrentThreadId());

        if (Program.hWndProcHook != IntPtr.Zero)
            Console.WriteLine("Hooked successfully.");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("Failed to hook.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer correctly solved the problem. Thank you! – Tu Le Hong Mar 19 '14 at 10:58

What can cause Windows to unhook a low level (global) keyboard hook? covers this. This situation can occur if the hook procedure times out. The timeout value is specified at the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop key with the value LowLevelHooksTimeout (although this value was not present on my system).

From MSDN (there is also some good info in Community Content at the bottom of this page):

If the hook procedure times out, the system passes the message to the next hook. However, on Windows 7 and later, the hook is silently removed without being called.

From Global hooks getting lost on windows

On Windows 7 we have to make sure that the callback function of the hook can return in less than LowLevelHooksTimeout, which is 300 ms. And we allow for the application to be timed out 10 times when processing the hook callback message. If it times out an 11th time, Windows will unhook the application from the hook chain. This is a by design feature and it was added in Win7 RTM.

That page also suggests using Raw Input instead.

Edit: here is Code Project tutorial on using Raw Input in C#.

share|improve this answer
    
My hook is thread hook, not a low level hook. In addition, the hook procedure does almost nothing but writing a single line to the console. How could it time out? – Tu Le Hong Oct 14 '12 at 3:55

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