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This is as close as I've gotten. In IE 9, the row header is positioned wrong. In IE 8, the text won't rotate the right direction (-90 vs 90 degrees). In Chrome, I can't resize the column width. I'd settle for getting this right in IE 9 for now. What do I need to do to make the rotated row headers position correctly in the row?

<html>
<head>
    <style type="text/css">
        .TableGroupHeader_cell
        {
            width: 3em;
            height: 20em;
            border: 2px solid #DDB575;
        }

        .TableGroupHeader_text
        {
            border : 1px solid black;
        }

        .TableGroupHeader_div
        {
            writing-mode:tb-rl;
           -webkit-transform:rotate(270deg);
           -moz-transform:rotate(270deg);
           -o-transform: rotate(270deg);

            text-align: center;
            font-weight: bold;
            font-size: large;
            border: 1px solid red;
            width: 10em;
            height: 2.5em;            
        }
    </style>
    <!--[if lt IE 9]>
        <style>            
            .TableGroupHeader_div
            {
                writing-mode:tb-rl;
               -ms-transform: rotate(10deg);

                text-align: center;
                font-weight: bold;
                font-size: large;
                border: 1px solid green;
                width: 2.5em;
                height: 10em;
            }
        </style>
    <![endif]-->

    <!--[if IE 9]>
        <style>            
            .TableGroupHeader_div
            {
                writing-mode:tb-rl;
               -ms-transform: rotate(180deg);

                text-align: center;
                font-weight: bold;
                font-size: large;
                border: 1px solid green;
                width: 2.5em;
                height: 10em;
            }
        </style>
    <![endif]-->

    <title>Test</title>
</head>
<body>
    <table>
        <tr class="TableDataRow">
            <td class="TableGroupHeader_cell">
                <div class="TableGroupHeader_div">
                    <label class="TableGroupHeader_text">Row Header</label>
                </div>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
Made some more progress on this for IE9 using relative positioning. Not sure its the best solution but its working. I'll look at IE8 tomorrow. –  Steve Wash Oct 14 '12 at 4:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't have many versions of Explorer at hand, but this code works so far in this browsers:

  • firefox 10.0.7 (linux)
  • firefox 14.0.1 (windows)
  • Opera 12.02 (linux and windows)
  • Explorer 9 (normal and compatibility view)
<style type="text/css">
* { border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }  
.TableGroupHeader_cell { width: 3em; height: 20em; border: 2px solid #DDB575; }  
.TableGroupHeader_div { text-align: center; font-weight: bold; font-size: large; border: 1px solid red; width: 10em; height: 6.5em; }  
.TableGroupHeader_div { writing-mode:tb-rl; -webkit-transform:rotate(270deg); -moz-transform:rotate(270deg); -o-transform: rotate(270deg); }  
.TableGroupHeader_text { border: 1px solid black; display: block; height: 100%; width: 100%; filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=2);  }  
</style>   

That code is yours with few extras, plus I removed all the comments, so no handling of explorer versions. And I separated the rules to make it more clear for me, I hope that is not a problem.

The main changes are to set the label as a block component and apply the filter property to the object.

You can read a about that here:

Bye

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, definitely better. The only issue is that with IE, width is width and height is height. I haven't checked Firefox or Opera yet, but Chrome switches width for height when it rotates. So it takes different settings to make the label a rectangle. –  Steve Wash Oct 14 '12 at 20:06
    
Hmmm, that is something I didn't realize. If I can come up with a better option, I'll let you know. But I suppose that means that you still have to use some kind of detection or manipulation after the page is rendered. Or may be, if you are using php or similar, you can write the right code for the right browser from the server. –  PatomaS Oct 14 '12 at 23:47

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